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Index of first names

Bonjedward

 

 

 

 

 

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Sally Douglas has contributed an article on the Lands of Bonjedward and the Douglas inheritance.  It is available as a flipbook, and as a pdf: pdf logo

 

 

 

Bonjedward stands on a ridge of land formed by the approach of the Teviot and Jed towards their junction. There are a wide variety of spellings: Bonne Jedburgh, Bon Jedburgh, Bonjedward, Bonjedworth, Beanjeddart, Bonjedwart, Boniedworth, Bonjedburght, Bunjedworth, Bondeidde ford, Boniedworth, Bonjeddeworth, etc. Bon is taken from bun, which is commonly used in the sense of 'river-mouth'. It appears the River Jed may have been known as Jedward.

The castle and town of Bonjedworth suffered their full share of the miseries of border warfare. The castle was converted at a later period into a gaol. In 1683 Sir John Biddell of that ilk and another were tried at the court of justiciary at Jedburgh for their religious opinions, and sentenced to be confined in the prison of Bonjedworth. The castle is now so completely demolished that not a trace of even its situation can be found. It was, in 1850, an inconsiderable hamlet though once a seat of strength having possessed a castle of some note.

A short distance farther to the west of the likely castle site is Bonjedward House, a magnificent listed Georgian house dating from the latter stages of the 18th century. It was remodelled and extended during the next century and is set in an imposing position in the centre of its own extensive gardens and policies. The house is built of cream sandstone rubble with polished cream ashlar dressings.

Bonjedward was, as part of large holdings in the Jedburgh Forest, and elsewhere, in 1320 granted by King Robert Bruce to 'The Good' Sir James Douglas, partly as a reward for his support at the battle of Bannockburn, and partly to bind him to the Bruce cause. These estates passed to James, 2nd earl of Douglas. Douglas married the Princess Isabel, a daughter of King Robert II of Scotland. He left no legitimate male issue. His natural sons William and Archibald became the ancestors of the families of Douglas of Drumlanrig (see Marquess of Queensberry) and Douglas of Cavers. His sister Isabel, inherited the lands and earldom of Mar, and the unentailed estates of Douglas. Isabel arranged for the Bonjedward estate, then including nearby Timpendean, to be passed to their half-sister, Margaret, who became 1st Laird of Bonjedward. Margaret had married a Thomas Johnson, but he and his son, John, changed their names to Douglas.

In 1479, George Douglas of Bonjedward, with consent of his heir, James, granted Timpendean to a younger son, Andrew. James appears to have died before his father, so in 1540 William Douglas, then son and heir of the late George Douglas of Bonjedward became Laird of Bonjedward.

In about 1710, Thomas Rutherfurd of Edgerston acquired the lands of Bonjedward and Mounthooly , together with the estates of Hunthill and Scraesburgh. In 1845, Bonjedward was sold to the Marquess of Lothian, in whose ownership much of the estate continues, the estate offices being located in the stables for Jedneuk House, which were converted to form a suite of offices.

 

 

 

Bonjedward, 'Jedward-foot ' from bun, which is common in the sense of 'river-mouth,' as in Bun Abha, Bonawe, 'Awe-foot.' It seems that the Gaelic people took Jedward to be the name of the river, instead of Jed, plainly a case of Gaelic supervening on English.
 
“Beanjeddart, Hundlie, and Huntil...” Douglas of Beanjeddart, an ancient branch of the house of Cavers, possessed property near the junction of the Jed and the Tiviot. (Beanjeddart = Bon Jedburgh.)

 

The castle and town of Bonjedworth suffered their full share of the miseries of border warfare. The castle was converted at a later period into a gaol. In 1683 Sir John Biddell of that ilk and another were tried at the court of justiciary at Jedburgh for their religious opinions, and sentenced to be confined in the prison of Bonjedworth. There is now no vestige of this important fort. Two farm onsteads and a few scattered cottages occupy the site of this ancient town.

Extract from Rutherfurd's border hand-book of 1849

The village of BONJEDWARD stands on a ridge of land formed by the approach of the Teviot and Jed towards their junction It is now an inconsiderable hamlet though once a seat of strength having possessed a castle of some note During the latter part of the 17th century a number of persons concerned in the rising of the Covenanters were imprisoned in it but the castle is now so completely demolished that not a trace of even its situation can be found A short distance farther to the west is Bonjedward House the seat of the Honourable Mr Talbot The view of Jedburgh on entering from the west has often been the theme of admiration to the traveller but that from the east is also of a very pleasing character Turning the curve of the road beyond Bonjedward wood the smoke of the old burgh comes on the view while the old abbey towers above the roofs a mass of sombre ruin giving the scene in connection with the uplands which surround it a highly picturesque appearance.


Bonjedward HouseBonjedward House is a magnificent listed Georgian house dating from the latter stages of the 18th century. It was remodelled and extended during the next century and is set in an imposing position in the centre of its own extensive gardens and policies. The house is built of cream sandstone rubble with polished cream ashlar dressings.
 
Thomas Rutherfurd of Edgerston succeeded his brother Andrew, in 1718. During his lifetime he acquired the lands of Bonjedward and Mounthooly, together with the estates of Hunthill and Scraesburgh. He is designed as Thomas Rutherfurd of Wells, in 1703. He married Susanna, daughter and heiress of Walter Riddell of Mynto. Susanna Riddell, Lady Rutherfurd, is mentioned as a widow in an agreement with her son, Sir John, regarding her provision, dated at Jedburgh, 13th February, 1722. It may be assumed, therefore, that Thomas Rutherfurd died about 1720.
 
THOMAS CALDERWOOD OF POLTON inherited considerable wealth from his father and in March 1735 married Margaret eldest daughter of Sir James Steuart of Goodtrees Baronet Solicitor General for Scotland by Anna daughter of Sir Hew Dalrymple of Northberwick President of the Court of Session who was then in her twentieth year. Mr and Mrs Calderwood returned to London in the spring of 1757 (from the Low countries) and in the following year Mr Calderwood devolved upon his wife the entire management of his estates and family affairs. Mrs Calderwood with her husband's consent sold his property of Bonjedward in Tweeddale and applied the price to the purchase of Linhouse. That this acquisition did not realise the full benefit which she anticipated was in part owing to the backward nature of its soil but she was thus enabled to hand over to her elder son six thousand acres of land in Mid Lothian on his coming of age and receiving from his father the family estate.
 
On 17 Sep 1809, Mr James Tait married Susan, 5th daughter of Thomas Caverhill at or of Bonjedward. (See below)
 
In the year, 1847, Major Forbes, who was then a tenant of the Marquis of Lothian, having taken Bonjedward House for a residence, became a member of the Jedforest Club. There is no further information about this gentleman.

In 1849, Bonjedward House was the seat of the Honourable Mr Talbot
 
It appears to have been owned by Major Pringle in 1856.
 
On 19th Feb 1867, the infant son of Vice-Admiral the Hon Charles Elliot died at Bonjedward.
 
William Penney, The Hon. Lord Kinloch, Judge of the Court of Session, Scotland, was living in the house in 1870.
 
Thomas Caverhill Jerdon, zoologist, (12 October 1811 - 12 June 1872) was the eldest son of Archibald Jerdon of Bonjedward

...ARCHIBALD JERDON, of Allerton. was elected a Fellow of the Society in 1871. He was born at Bonjedward on 21st September 1819, and educated at the Edinburgh ...
 
...Its history, as now confirmed, traces the painting to the ownership of Peter
Alexander Speirs, of Bonjedward House, Jedburgh, Scotland, a nephew of the ...
 
Richard Swan may have been the owner in 1979, when he married Jean Agnew. 
Archibald Jerdon of Bonjedward was the only son of Thomas Caverhill and Jane Jerdon, only daughter of Archibald Jerdon of Bonjedward, nicknamed " Baldy." The subject of this memoir was baptized Archibald Jerdon, as heir to his grandfather, the laird of Bonjedward. There was also one daughter of the marriage, Jane Caverhill, who married the Rev. Peter Young of Jedburgh. As a marriage portion Mr Jerdon gave his daughter the farm of Bonjedward Townhead, and built a suitable house for her as a residence. She died there on the 29th of February 1780, aged 30 years.

Thomas Caverhill was the nephew of Andrew Caverhill of Jedburgh. He married, secondly, Jane Douglas, and by her had several daughters; she died in 1797, aged 38 years.

Archibald Jerdon was educated at the Grammar School, Durham, and there became acquainted with Mr Milner of South Shields, whose sister, Elizabeth Sarah Milner, he afterwards married. When the old laird of Bonjedward died, Archibald was still in his minority. A family of the name of Jerdon claimed the estate — they were relations of the Jerdons who then lived at The Nest, Jedburgh. A lawsuit followed. Archibald's agent was Cgmelius Elliot of WooUee, (?Woodlee) W.S., who got the case decided in his client's favour. After Mr Jerdon married, he resided at Bonjedward House. His family consisted of two sons and five daughters.

From its formation he was a member of the Jedforest Club.

In the year 1810 he was appointed captain in the 1st Regiment of Roxburghshire local militia. This was not his first taste of soldiering, however, for he had formerly held a commission in the Jedburgh volunteers. Mr Jerdon was very popular in and around Jedburgh. He was an extremely kind-hearted man, and most liberal in all his dealings — perhaps too much so for his income. More than once he got himself into difficulties, and was obliged to sell portions of his Bonjedward estate. In the year 1842, Mr and Mrs Jerdon died, within a short time of each other, through eating something poisonous, it was generally believed. Many stories were current at the time, but, curious to relate, no steps were taken to discover what the poison consisted of, or how it came to be administered. Another of the family, Mrs Jerdon's sister, also died suddenly, not very long afterwards, in an equally mysterious manner. Husband and wife were buried on the same day in the Abbey churchyard.
 
In 1845, Bonjedward was sold to the Marquess of Lothian, who now (1899) possesses the whole estate.

 

Mrs Maxine Anne Day (or Willson) acquired the house in December 1999, shortly after the death of her first husband, the late Peter Day, at a price of £465,000; it had been valued by her surveyor at £430,000. The property comprised Bonjedward House itself, which she made her home, and certain cottages and outbuildings. She later married Andrew Willson, and lived in Bonjedward. They divorced in 2008.

 

Bonjedward - sale 1845The London Times, Sat 22 March, 1845

 
Grazong advert Land sale advert
Caledonian Mercury – 13/9/1800 Caledonian Mercury 9/6/1808

I am indebted to Sally Douglas who has compiled a history of the Douglases of Bonjedward and Timpendean. This can be downloaded as a pdf pdf logo or as a Flip Book..



 
See also:  
a.  Douglas of Bonjedward
b.  Map of the area, 1654 Extracted from Blaeu Atlas of Scotland, 1654. Opens in a new window

 

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Last modified: Saturday, 18 March 2017