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Index of first names

Genealogy - our guide to finding you family roots

 

There are a large number of excellent website devoted to helping researchers understand how they might go about discovering the family roots.  It is not our intention to repeat what may be presented elsewhere.  However, we do provide some links to sites which can help you.

What we do intend to do is indicate some of the material we have used, and some we probably should have used if only we had known about them sooner!

Genealogists use a wide variety of records in their research. To effectively conduct genealogical research, it is important to understand how the records were created, what information is included in them, and how and where to access them.

To keep track of their citizens, governments began keeping records of persons who were neither royalty nor nobility. In much of Europe, for example, such record keeping started in the 16th century. As more of the population was recorded, there were sufficient records to follow a family.

Major life events, such as births, marriages, and deaths, were often documented with a license, permit, or report. Genealogists locate these records in local, regional or national offices or archives and extract information about family relationships and recreate timelines of persons' lives.

Contents
 
  • Genealogy - Home
  • Abbreviations
  • Confucius
  • Cousins table
  • DNA
  • Family names
  • Given names
  • Myths of research
  • Useful websites
  • Wikis
  • Work chart
  • In China, India and other Asian countries, genealogy books are used to record the names, occupations, and other information about family members, with some books dating back hundreds or even thousands of years. In the eastern Indian state of Bihar, there is a written tradition of genealogical records among Maithil Brahmins and Karna Kayasthas called "Panjis", dating to the 12th century CE. Even today these records and are consulted prior to marriages.

    In Ireland, genealogical records were recorded by professional families of senchaidh (historians) until as late as the mid-17th century, when Gaelic civilization died out. Perhaps the most outstanding example of this genre is Leabhar na nGenealach/The Great Book of Irish Genealogies, by Dubhaltach MacFhirbhisigh (d. 1671), published in 2004.

    The family tree of Confucius has been maintained for over 2,500 years, and is listed in the Guinness Book of Records as the largest extant family tree. The fifth edition of the Confucius Genealogy was printed in 2009 by the Confucius Genealogy Compilation Committee (CGCC).

    Data sharing among genealogical researchers has grown to be a major use of the Internet.  Most genealogy software programs (such as Legacy, which we use) can export information about persons and their relationships in GEDCOM format, so it can be shared with other genealogists by e-mail and Internet forums, added to an online databases, such as TNG, the software we use for our database, or converted into a family web site. Many genealogical software applications also facilitate the sharing of information via CD-ROMs and DVDs.

    Social networking service (SNS) websites allow genealogists to share data and build their family trees online. Members can upload their family trees and contact other family historians to fill in gaps in their research.

    See also: Extreme genealogy


    Errors and omissions

    We are looking for your help to keep the Douglas Archives accurate.

    If you spot errors, or omissions, then please do let us know.

    The Forum

    If you have met a brick wall with your research, then posting a notice in the Douglas Archives Forum may be the answer. Or, it may help you find the answer!

    You may also be able to help others answer their queries.

    Visit the Douglas Archives Forum.

    What's new?

    We try to keep everyone up to date with new entries, via our What's New section on the home page.

    We also use the blog to keep researchers abreast of developments in the Douglas Archives.

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    The content of this website is a collection of materials gathered from a variety of sources, some of it unedited.

    The webmaster does not intend to claim authorship, but gives credit to the originators for their work.

    As work progresses, some of the content may be re-written and presented in a unique format, to which we would then be able to claim ownership.

    Discussion and contributions from those more knowledgeable is welcome.

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    Last modified: Tuesday, 01 December 2015