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Index of first names

Max Douglas

 

 

 

 

Max DouglasMax Douglas (born September 15, 1970) is a Canadian comic book creator. Since approximately 1996, he has worked under the pen name of Salgood Sam which is derived from a reverse spelling of his name.

After spending his late teens drawing zines, Douglas had his first credited published art in a co-created black-and-white comic book for Caliber Comics, Nature of the Beast. Shortly afterward, in 1992, Douglas started working at Marvel Comics on Clive Barker's Nightbreed #20, from the company's Epic Comics imprint.

After that he was hired to draw Nightbreed #23, and then assigned Saint Sinner, a new title under the short-lived Razorline imprint, created for Marvel by Clive Barker. Douglas designed the characters, penciled and inked the first four issues of the title, and collaborated on the series until issue #5. For Marvel he also worked on Morbius, the Living Vampire #25, a 10-page story titled "Drainage System", scripted by Karl Bollers; Dr. Strange #63, "Song of the Blood Opal", by David Quinn; and a Spider-Man 2099 story in 2099 Unlimited #8.


He drew the DC Comics character Bloodwynd in Showcase '94 #5 (May 1994), before switching to animation for work during much of the latter 1990s, working at Nelvana in Toronto, and CinéGroupe in Montreal. In the mid-1990s, he also started to sign his art Salgood Sam, a pen name based on the mirror image of his given name.

In 2000,, under the pseudonym Salgood Sam, Douglas' art appeared in Real Worlds: Wonder Woman Vs. the Red Menace, and Muties #6. Shortly afterward, he worked as an inker on Goran Parlov's pencils for Terminator 3: Before the Rise, published by Beckett Comics.


Douglas then self-published the comic Revolver One in late 2004. It was nominated for Best Emerging Artist by the Doug Wright Awards the following year. Douglas then teamed with Kieron Dwyer and Rick Remender to create Sea of Red, a monthly series from Image Comics. In early 2006, Douglas contributed art to Revolution on the Planet of the Apes, published by Mr. Comics.

In 2007, he drew Therefore Repent!, a graphic novel written by Jim Munroe, published by No Media Kings in Canada and IDW Publishing in the US.


In 2008 he contributed to Comic Book Tattoo, an anthology comic book of stories based on or inspired by songs by American singer-songwriter Tori Amos, published by Image Comics.

From the mid- to late-2000s, Douglas posted art from a planned graphic novel, Dream Life on his site and a live journal blog dedicated to the project. Recently Dream Life has become part of the line up at Transmission X.

In 2009, he illustrated the story "Widows", written by Rantz Hoseley, in Awesome 2: Awesomer, an anthology published by Top Shelf Productions in support of a student scholarship for the Center for Cartoon Studies. He's listed as a contributor to the upcoming Popgun 4, and has posted mention of work on an upcoming Ghostbusters comic in 2010 on his blog.

Douglas also dabbles in comics journalism, publishing a comics site dedicated Canadian centric news, called Sequential.

Comic Jams or Comix Jams are social gatherings loosely based around a constraint-based exercise reminiscent of Raymond Queneau's Oulipo (Workshop for Potential Literature) and its subsequent comics arm, Oubapo (Workshop for Potential Comics). In the 60's in San Francisco, Robert Crumb & the Zap Comix 'all Stars' produced short often non narrative comix that make the earliest well documented use of the name 'Comix Jam'.


In 1995 Max became involved in organizing collaborative Comix Jams after attending a few in Montreal hosted by Rupert Bottenberg. He helped organize one of the first of such events held in Toronto, arranging to have Rupert and a group of Montreal Jam regulars to attend, and promoting the event locally to the Toronto Comics scene. The event was a success, including coverage from the local media. And inspired one attendee, Zine publisher Dave Howard, to take up hosting similar events on a monthly basis.


After Moving to Montreal Max began hosting monthly Jams there, publishing the pages online and in regular Zines. He hosted the events from 2001 to 2004 approximately.

 

Max writes: 'My family name, Douglas, was gentrified by my great grandfather when he moved to Canada. It was Dolgonos in Russia. I am to my knowledge, the last male to carry the name Douglas in my family. On that side the rest of my generation are girls and the daughters of my aunt, so they don't have the name.'

 

 

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Last modified: Saturday, 18 March 2017