Professor Mark Douglas

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Mark Douglas  

 


Mark Douglas is a professor of Christian ethics at Columbia Theological Seminary and he is known for his work on religious language in the public sphere, medical and business ethics, the American philosophical tradition of pragmatism, the environment, just war and pacifism, and the role of religion in political philosophy.

Douglas received a B.A. from Colorado College (1989), a M.Div. from Princeton Theological Seminary (1993), a Th.M. from Princeton Theological Seminary (1994), and a Ph.D. from the University of Virginia (2000). Beginning in 1997, he became an adjunct faculty member at Virginia Commonwealth University. He also served as the co-pastor at Tabor Presbyterian Church in Crozet, Virginia (1997-1999) before coming to Columbia Theological Seminary, where he took the position of assistant professor of Christian ethics (1999-2005).

Douglas currently still serves at Columbia Theological Seminary as professor of Christian ethics and the director of the seminary's Master of Divinity degree program. Additionally, he serves as the chair of the board of Georgia Interfaith Power and Light, the largest faith-based environmental organization in Georgia.

Douglas' work extends into a wide range of areas within the field of ethics. He has published several books and has contributed numerous articles and book chapters to variety of publications. He also is the founding and current editor of @ This Point: theological investigations in church and culture, the online journal of Columbia Theological Seminary, and serves on a number of other editorial and professional boards.

As a Christian ethicist his main focus is integrating religion and justice both within and outside of the church. In 2015 he participated in a teach-in at Columbia Theological Seminary where he gave a lecture titled, Reformed Theology and Capital Punishment. He currently serves on the Study Team on Prospects for a Just Peace in Israel and Palestine, which will report to the Advisory Committee on Social Witness Policy of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). As part of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) his role on this committee is to look "at a range of possibilities consistent with the church’s commitment to justice, peace, self determination and related values." He advocates for the Church to create "a more capacious space for disagreement which can be the starting point for learning how to live with each other."

He has authored numerous publications.

 

Sources


Sources for this article include:
•  Faculty Directory, Columbia Theological Seminary

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Last modified: Wednesday, 18 July 2018