James Sholto Cameron Douglas

Click here to 
Print this page

Biography finder

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

J

K

L

M

N

O

P

Q

R

S

T

U

V

W

X

Y

Z

 

 

Index of first names

James Sholto Cameron Douglas (1879-1931) was Professor of pathology at Sheffield.  He was the eldest son of Claude Douglas, honorary surgeon to Leicester Royal Infirmary, and his wife, Louisa Bolitho Peregrine, of London. Both his grandfathers were also in medical practice: James Douglas, L.R.C.S. (Edin.), was Consulting Surgeon to the Infirmary in Bradford and Thomas Peregrine, M.D. (Edin.), M.R.C.P. (London), was in practice in London.

J.S. Douglas was an older brother of Claude Gordon Douglas. Born in Leicester, he was educated at Wyggeston School and at Haileybury. In 1898, he entered Christ Church, Oxford with an exhibition and took first class in the final honours school of physiology in 1902. Bt clinical work at St George's Hospital he qualified BMMCh in 1905, gaining a Radcliffe Fellowship by which he worked with Schnorl at Dresden and with Deyer at Copenhagen and Oxford. With Dreyer, he published papers of the absorption of agglutins by bacteria and on charcoal.

Douglas was appointed Lecturer in Pathology at Birmingham in 1909 and moved to Manchester in 1903. In 1915, he was appointed to succeed Dean as Professor of pathology at Sheffield. Douglas was regarded as a good teacher and a good colleague who took his full part in administration, particularly as Dean of the Medical School.

Douglas was elected a member of the Physiological Society in 1909 but published no physiological work; his published work was in pathology.

James Sholto Cameron Douglas is buried in the Saint Tudno Church Cemetery Llandudno alongside Mary Victoire Emily Douglas (1879-1965). Also in the same plot are Charles Edward Jewel Whitting 1900-1973 and his wife Alexena Livingston 1911-2003 whom he married on 8th Dec 1945 in Lagos, Nigeria.

Obituary 21 November 1931
Abstract
THE sudden death of James Sholto Cameron Douglas on Oct. 30 at Llandudno, where he had gone to recuperate after a long illness, was a very great grief to his many friends. Prof. Douglas was more closely in touch with his colleagues, both scientific and medical, than is usual in a university; for not only had he held the Joseph Hunter chair of pathology at the University of Sheffield since 1915 and been Dean of the Faculty of Medicine since 1923, bat his professorship also involved him in a multitude of administrative duties, including the direction of the pathological work at the various hospitals in the city. In addition, he was always being called upon by his medical colleagues for expert advice on pathological matters. Not only did he carry out his duties with unsparing zeal, but as a most unselfish man he also responded willingly to all demands for assistance.

Notes:
1.  Captain James Sholto Cameron Douglas. Royal Army Medical Corps. 3rd Northern General Hospital. James Sholto Cameron Douglas, M.D., to be Captain, whose services will be available on Mobilization. Dated 19th July, 1915. Mention in Dispatches.
2.  Royal Humane Society's Silver Medal 1909.
3.  Charles Edward Jewel Whitting had married Mary Victoire Emily only daughter of Richard Brice, of Charlynch, Somerset on 16th Sep 1896.   Charles Edward Jewel Whitting apparently was associated with the Royal Asiatic Society.   He may have written the book: Hausa and Fulani Proverbs published in Lagos in 1940. He and his father (same name) were both at Trinity, University of Cambridge.



Any contributions will be gratefully accepted





Back to top

 



The content of this website is a collection of materials gathered from a variety of sources, some of it unedited.

The webmaster does not intend to claim authorship, but gives credit to the originators for their work.

As work progresses, some of the content may be re-written and presented in a unique format, to which we would then be able to claim ownership.

Discussion and contributions from those more knowledgeable is welcome.

Contact Us

Last modified: Wednesday, 18 July 2018