Early Douglas arrivals in Tennessee

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Index of first names


This page is a stub.

Who was the first Douglas in Tennessee?

Here are some early arrivals:

• Matthew Douglas was born in 1790 in Washington County Tennessee. He died 1845 in Elk Valley Tennessee. His father, John Douglas, was born in 1754 in Surry County, North Carolina. He died in 1842 in Washington County, Tennessee.

• John Douglas, son of James Douglas and Mary Verner, was born on 18 Mar 1764 in Surry, North Carolina, USA.
He married (1) Nancy Jobe on 18 Nov 1838 in Washington, Tennessee, USA. She was born in 1764. He married (2) Elizabeth Ford in 1784 in Cabarrus, North Carolina, USA. She was born in 1764 in Surry, North Carolina, USA. She died in 1815 in Jonesborough, Washington, Tennessee, USA.
John Douglas died on 01 Jun 1842 in Washington, Tennessee, USA.
 
• Joseph Douglas, son of William Douglas and Sarah Berryman, was born in 1735 in Charles, Maryland, USA.
He married Crotia Mary Bickford on 01 May 1776 in Orange, North Carolina, USA. She was born on 24 Nov 1895 in Missouri, USA. She died on 04 Nov 1996 in Orange, Orange, California, USA.
Joseph Douglas died in 1810 in Grainger, Tennessee, USA.

• Bryant F Douglas, son of John Rabon Douglas and Susan Howee, was born on 09 Sep 1798 in Cabarrus, North Carolina, USA.
He married (1) Abigail G Fuller in 1839. She was born on 01 Dec 1816 in North Carolina, USA. She died on 08 Aug 1896 in Henderson, Tennessee, USA. He married (2) Rhoda D Johnson on 28 May 1821 in Mecklenburg, Virginia, USA. She was born on 24 Apr 1799 in North Carolina, USA. She died on 12 Nov 1839 in Chester, Pennsylvania, USA.
Bryant F Douglas died on 18 Feb 1867 in Lexington, Henderson, Tennessee, USA.
His brother, Rayborn Douglas was born in 1803 in Cabarrus, North Carolina, USA and died on 12 May 1886 in Lexington, Henderson, Tennessee, USA.

• Martha Douglas, daughter of John Douglas and Sarah Dunn, was born in 1786 in Pendleton, Anderson, South Carolina, USA.
She married James Steele Meek on 29 Sep 1808 in Knox, Tennessee, USA. He was born in 1785 in Virginia, USA. He died in 1865 in Princeton, Caldwell, Kentucky, USA.
She died on 13 Aug 1858 in Caldwell, Kentucky, USA.

• The Douglass family has been prominent in Sumner County since 1785, when Edward Douglass, with all his children, settled on Station Camp Creek a few miles north from Gallatin. He was born in Farquier County, Virginia; married about 1740, Sarah George.
He was a commissioned officer in the War of Independence, and a man of education, and a lawyer, though he had never practiced law. He, when called upon, gave legal advice to his friends, and neighbours without fee or reward, always counselling them not to go into the courts. He was one of the first magistrates of Sumner County, and was active in all public affairs. His home was near Salem Camp Group, on lands apparently still in possession of his descendants.
Edward and Sarah Douglass's children were: John Douglass, killed by Indians while on a mission to them from Colonel Anthony Bledsoe, William Douglass, who married Peggy Stroud, Elizabeth Douglass, who married William Cage, Elmore Douglass, who married Betsey Blakemore, who Ezekiel Douglass, married May Gibson, Sally Douglass, who married Thomas Blakemore, Edward Douglass, Jr., who married Elizabeth Howard, Reuben Douglass, who married Elizabeth Edwards and James Douglass, who married Catherine Collier.

• Elijah Douglas was born 1783 in Tn.. He married Rebecca. She was born 1785.
Children:
i. Drewery (Drew)2 Douglas, b. Abt. 1811, Wayne County, Ms; d. 1896, Providence Cem. Wayne County, Ms.
ii. Milley Douglas, b. 1825; d. March 15, 1877.
iii. William A. Douglas, b. 1826.

• The Clark House, Sumner County, Tennessee is the home of four brothers who served in the Confederate army, as did many of Sumner County’s young men. Their father, William F. Clark, a Protestant minister, died in 1847 at the age of forty-one, leaving his wife, Emma Douglass Clark, to rear the boys. Emma Clark, the daughter of Reuben and Elizabeth Edwards Douglass, was the granddaughter of Col. Edward and Sarah George Douglass who came to Sumner County in the late 1700s.

Three of the sons died in service. Pvt. Edward Clark, Co. C, 7th Tennessee Infantry, was killed in action at the Second Battle of Manassas on August 27, 1862. He was only 18 years old. Pvt. David Fulton Clark, Co. F, 30th Tennessee Infantry, was killed May 12, 1863, at the Battle of Raymond, Mississippi. Pvt. Reuben Douglas Clark, Co. C, 7th Tennessee Infantry, died of wounds he suffered during Gen. John Bell Hood’s retreat from Nashville in 1864. The fourth brother, Pvt. Charles Clark, survived the war. He enlisted in 1862 and was discharged in 1865 from the 19th and 20th Consolidated Tennessee Cavalry, in Gen. Tyree H. Bell’s brigade of Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest’s command.

• Baxter W Douglas was born circa 1892 in Tennessee, to Lafayette A Douglas and Thena Douglas. Baxter had one sibling: Clarence A Douglas.

• Harry Douglass was a captain in 1st Regiment of Tennessee Volunteer Infantry under Col Edward Bradley and fought at the Battle of Talladega (9 November 1813)
• Harry L. Douglass was a captain in 1st Regiment Tennessee Volunteers under Col William Hall being part of part of Andrew Jackson's abortive mission to Natchez. (Probably the same as above)
• William Douglass was a captain in 3rd Regiment of Tennessee Militia under Col Stephen Copeland and may have participated in the Battle of Horseshoe Bend (27 March 1814).

Jesse T. Douglas (3 Nov 1808 - 11 Sept 1863) and his Wife Majincy E. Roughton Douglas were both born near Murfreesboro, Tennessee




See also:
Dr Lewis Douglass
Douglas Lake, Dam and Bluff

Notes:
• It seems likely that Cato, Lewis's father, was a slave held by Bryant Douglas. In 1860, a male aged 7 is listed, probably Lewis.
• I have been advised that I need to go back into North Carolina first as Tennessee was created out of North Carolina. I also need to look at "The Lost State of Franklin", which existed for a period of about 30 days.  This sems to be covered well, if in a condensed form, by the Wikipedia article.



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Last modified: Saturday, 18 March 2017