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*** Douglas

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

LONDON AND MIDDLESEX CASES.
OLD COURT.—Monday, April 9th, 1849.

824. GEORGE DOUGLAS , stealing 1 pair of trowsers and a shirt, value 13s., the goods of Edward Thornhill; 1 neckerchief, 5s., the goods of Thomas Black; and 1 neckerchief, 2s., the goods of John Black; in a vessel in a port.

JOHN BLACK . I am an apprentice on board the Rose which was lying in the London Dock. Last Friday week the prisoner came on board at ten o'clock, and asked me for some potatoes and soup—I gave him some potatoes—he asked the captain if he needed a cook—he went down into the forecastle to sleep—I saw him there—he left at four—some time after he was gone I missed from my chest a silk handkerchief—I saw the prisoner again next Sunday, with my brother's handkerchief on his neck—I asked him for it—he said he would not give it me, at first; at last he asked if I would give him 1d. for it—I said, "I shall not"—he at last gave it me.

EDWARD THORNHILL . I am a seaman on board the Rose. I saw the prisoner there on the Friday—I left a shirt and pair of trowsers in care of the boys—I afterwards missed them—these are them (produced).

Prisoner. They are my own trowsers; I made them when I was crossing the line on leaving Sidney. Witness. They are mine—I made them myself on my passage from Madras.

JAMES GRIFFIN (policeman, H 77). The prisoner was given in my charge by Black for stealing these things—he said he had never seen either the boy or the ship before, and bad never been in the London Dock above once before—afterwards, in going to the police-court, he said he had seen the boy, and asked him for a drink of water—he also added that he bought seven yards of the stuff, and had made the trowsers himself as he was coming from Sidney in the Dido—he had them on.

THOMAS BLACK . I had charge of the trowsers and shirt—I put them in a chest in the forecastle—I missed them on the Thursday at four o'clock, and my black handkerchief also—I saw the prisoner with the trowsers on, and sent the police after him, but they did not get him.

Prisoner's Defence. When I went to the ship I saw this young lad; I know nothing of the shirt or handkerchief.

GUILTY . Aged 20.— Confined One Month

 

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