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Index of first names

Hartlepool (Hertlepole)- Durham - 1312

 

 

 

 

 

 


Hartlepool wallsRobert de Brus died in the year 1245 and was succeeded by his son Robert who “...builded the haven and wall about the towne of Hertlepole, with ten towers on eche syde of the haven, and a chayne to be drawn between them near the haven, which haven would hold a C (sea) sayle...” The importance here was that this haven was capable of receiving ships and soldiers from the continent. Moreover, because of the improvements “...Brus was enabled to support his market and fair at Hartlepool, and to levy duties on ships and fishing-boats entering his harbour...” This Robert died in 1295.


In 1306, his son, Robert, asserted his claim to Scotland (a claim which his father too would like to have made). He (Brus) was declared a traitor and rebel by King Edward II and as a retaliation “...his manor of Hart, the borough of Hartlepool, and all other property (owned by him) in the bishoprie of Durham, were granted to (a favoured Englishman) Robert de Clifford and his heirs for ever, saving the rights of the church of St Cuthbert...” The de Clifford family held Hart for three centuries.


“... In 1312 the Scots, under Sir James Douglas, (as a pay-back) penetrated to Hartlepool carrying off much spoil, and many prisoners of both sexes...” Two years later they again ravaged the county plundering and destroying villages. The frightened inhabitants of Hartlepool took to the sea in ships for safety.

 

In 1315, James Douglas is said to have torched the town while its hapless inhabitants took to the sea for safety and watched from boats as their homes burned to the ground. Shortly afterwards, the town walls were built.

Grimm’s sketch (above) shows the western walls reinforced with earthwork defences in front, perhaps a result of repair and re-fortification made by a Scottish garrison during the Civil War in the 1640s. Sadly, everything in this view was demolished in the 19th century.

 

  • In historical, topographical, and descriptive view of the county – Duram – Volume 1 – by Eneas Mackenzie and Marvin Ross – 1834 – Mackenzie and Dent, Pilgram Street, Newcastle upon Tyne
  • The Local Records of Stockton and the neighbourhood... – by Thomas Richmond – 1868 – William Robinson, London


26th January, 2013


Sally E Douglas

 



 

 

 

 

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