Lindores Abbey

Lindores Abbey was founded in the late 12th century by David, Earl of Huntingdon, brother of King William I.

Lindores Abbey is steeped in Scottish history; it was here in 1306 that the three puissant knights, Sir Gilbert Hay of Errol, Sir Neil Campbell of Lochaw and Sir Alexander Seton vowed at the high altar to “defend the King Robert Bruce and his crown to the last of their blood and fortunes”. It was also at Lindores Abbey that William Wallace and his men rested after their victorious battle at the nearby forest of Blackearnside and it was recorded by the famous poet Blind Harry in his chronicles of the life of Wallace that:

The Worthy Scots go into the barrier, wash all their wounds, refresh and make good cheer. “At many bouts” said Wallace “I have been, but such a fierce attack have scarcely seen”
Then from a strand of water running by He all his men supplied abundantly Drunk first himself, then said in sober mood “The wine in France I ne’er thought half so good”.

David, Duke of Rothesay, the ill fated heir to the throne was quickly buried here in 1401 after having been put to death in Falkland Palace and for many years James the ninth and last of the “Black Douglases” found retirement here.

The 9th Earl had made a futile attempt to regain his power a number of years after the Battle of Arkinholm, but he was captured and banished to Lindores Abbey where he died in 1488. With the passing of the 9th Earl, the line of the Black Earls of Douglas failed. Douglases, however, continued to be influential in Scottish history in the lines of the Red Douglases, Douglases of Morton, and the Douglases of Queensberry.

Location: Newburgh, Fife
 




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This page was last updated on 02 May 2016

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