Pietro Maria Scotti

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vigoleno Castello di Agazzano.  
 
 

 



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Pietro Maria Scotti, Known as Buso.
From Vigoleno. Ghibelline. Count of Vigoleno and Carpaneto Piacentino.


Pietro Maria Scotti, was also known as Conte Buso for his sword skills (“buso” meaning “hole”, for the “signature” he left on his victims’ body),


Family


Son of a Guelph-Ghibelline union, a Guelph (by birth and also on his mother's side, daughter of the leader of the Red part of Parma) with a daughter of Pallavicino Pallavicini (chief of the Ghibelline part, in turn son of Roland the Magnificent and of a Scotti Guelph), Pietro Maria bore the name of one of his grandparents, Pietro Maria (dei) Rossi.

Pietro Maria Scotti was the son of Count Francesco Maria Scotti (? -1511).
He married Camilla Scotti di Fombio, with whom he had a son, Galeazzo. She is said to be 'a  Malaspina'.

Brother Guglielmo
Brother-in-law Gisello Malaspina
Brother-in-law Ludovico Caracciolo


Timeline


Pietro Maria Scotti was forced to leave Piacenza due to the turbulence he caused in the city.

In early 1514, he returned to Piacenza from Rome. He finds himself in considerable financial difficulty due to heavy expenses that he has had to bear; he is also annoyed because the contract for the city duties were rented by the Apostolic Chamber to a company headed by Lazzaro Malvicini and Niccolò Scotti after the payment of 25,000 scudi. He arms around a hundred troublemakers, including his brother Guglielmo, with whom he attacks the houses of his rivals to plunder them. Numerous Guelphs were killed in the action; the latter in turn take up arms; several clashes arise in the city near the church of San Simone and in the vicinity of that of San Donnino.
In mid-February the pontifical governor Tommaso Campeggi had the doors closed and the guard posts strengthened. The Guelphs strengthen themselves on the towers of Sant'Antonio, San Francesco, Santa Brigida, of Sant'Eufemia and on the terrace of the Landi from where they beat the Ghibellines' homes with their barrages. The latter concentrated their forces near the Landi houses, the cathedral towers and the church of San Pietro in Foro. The fighting lasted a few days until, on Campeggi's instructions, both the Guelphs and the Ghibellines (including Scotti) left Piacenza through two different gates. The conflict moves to the countryside. Attacked by Guelph militias led by Troilo dei Rossi and Federico Gonzaga da Bozzolo he took refuge in Carpaneto Piacentino. At the beginning of March, peace was ratified between the factions to which Scotti did not belong. He joins with other malcontents; at the head of 1000 men gathered in Rivalta he makes a new attempt against Piacenza with Jacopo dal Verme. He forces open the Door of San Lazzaro, he scales the walls and takes over the watchtowers. He calls the Sforza leader Ludovico Vistarini from Lodi. The action ends with nothing done.
During the summer, with the protection of Galeazzo and Antonio Maria Pallavicini he harasses his brother-in-law Gisello Malaspina in his territories who is fighting in the opposing camp; he robs a load of wheat destined for Piacenza and damages an aqueduct owned by a church.
He moved to the service of the Sforza against the French; continues its devastation in the Piacenza area with burning of villages and killing of soldiers and inhabitants.
In February 1515, he takes over the castles of Predovera, Macerata and Statto which belong to his brother-in-law Ludovico Caracciolo.
During the Spring, At the head of 3000 followers, among whom there are many men sent to him by the Landi and the Anguissola, he takes away the castle of Viustino from Bertolino Nicelli which collapses following some artillery shots: the loot is rich, consisting of considerable quantities of wheat, wine, hay and livestock. He frees the fortress of Groppo from the siege placed there by the Guelphs and forces Nicelli to flee after inflicting heavy new losses on him. He obtains the same results in Val Nure (conquest of Ronco); he occupies the castle of Ferriere which he hands over to Antonio Maria Pallavicini.
A papal brief puts an end to the fights between Guelphs and Ghibellines. Scotti makes peace with Jacopo Anguissola, some of whose houses he had previously looted. He is exiled to Florence.
In August, hw was allowed to return to the Piacenza area despite the resistance offered by the papal lieutenant of Piacenza Goro Gheri, who considers him an instrument of the Pallavicini. He sells Vigoleno to Gian Marco Pollastrelli for the sum of 4000 imperial lire.
In October 1518, his assets are confiscated by the French.
He was condemned to death in absentia, for rebellion, by the French in April 1519.
In September, Jacques de Sainte-Colombe and the artillery captain Jean Pommereul attacked him in the fortress of Predovera, in Val di Prino, where he gave asylum to around forty bandits: it was stormed and the French hanged the 18 men found there. Pietro Buso Scotti escapes capture because the previous night he [accidentally] left for personal reasons. The castle was demolished by Lautrec.
In 1520, he connects with the groups of exiles in Germany headed by Girolamo Morone.
In early 1521, he fought in the service of the Duke of Milan Francesco Sforza. He is in Motella and Verolanuova to collect infantry; delivered some money to the troops, he moves to Reggio Emilia.
In July, Prospero Colonna sends him to Piacenza with other escapees; here with 200 light horses and 300 infantry he holds his own against his opponents. He takes possession of the Val di Nure and cuts the supply lines to the capital. The French called together his factional opponents such as Paride and Cesare Scotti. With the Anguissola family he organized a treaty with Tameo da Treviso, constable of the Porta di San Raimondo in Piacenza who should have found access to the city open on the night of San Giovanni. The plot is discovered by Cesare Scotti; Tameo da Treviso runs away; Pietro Buso Scotti runs away. He continues to travel the streets of Piacenza. In mid-July in Alseno he intercepted two wagons carrying the money intended for the wages of the French garrison of Parma. Almost all the infantrymen in the escort are killed.
At the beginning of Augusr he attacks Piacenza again at the Porta di San Raimondo; this is set on fire: some of his men scale the city walls; they are rejected by the inhabitants. He is suddenly besieged in the castle of Statto by Girolamo da Trivulzio and Cesare Scotti: he leaves on a sortie in which he loses twenty men. He flees into the mountains. In the action he was injured in the knee (or arm) by a shotgun blast and therefore had to be transported on a stretcher to Reggio Emilia. He meets with Colonna. Not yet recovered he reaches the camp on the Enza with Bartolomeo da Villachiara and Marcantonio della Motella. He devastates the Parma area; he conquers the castles of Vigoleno, Diolo and Tavazzano; he obtains Fiorenzuola d'Arda and Borgo San Donnino (Fidenza); he besieges the castle of Agazzano, belonging to Gaspare Scotti, defended by 500 French infantry. Assale Castel San Giovanni with Ettore Visconti.
In September, Agazzano surrenders to the Sforza. Scotti divides the spoils among his men: Visconti also arrives and, evidently defrauded of his share of the loot, has him killed by his soldiers with a sword blow that cuts off his head. His body is thrown among the rubbish in the moat in the castle. It was never found, but his ghost is said to roam the castle.

Quotes



• “He had a very lively spirit, a fickle whim; his rest seemed like death to him. In the midst of calm he longed for storms, arming his heart to arouse new disputes and new turbulences over time." DE' CRESCENZI

• “If he joined the Gebelline faction, making himself leader of the bandits, who is greatly feared; although he has no credit with those who live well, but only with sad ones. In any case, he is open to mutiny." TREES

• “Bloody man, party leader.” LITTA

• “This character, (who with his exploits animated the Piacenza chronicles from 1514 until his death in September 1521), presents very interesting aspects from the point of view of the factions. Son of a Guelph-Ghibelline union, a Guelph (by birth and also on his mother's side, daughter of the leader of the Red part of Parma) with a daughter of Pallavicino Pallavicini (chief of the Ghibelline part, in turn son of Roland the Magnificent and of a Scotti Guelph), Pietro Maria bore the name of one of his grandparents, Pietro Maria (dei) Rossi. His genealogy therefore referred to two aristocratic leaders, a Ghibelline and a Guelph, both of whom in different periods of their lives were at loggerheads with the prince (the Duke of Milan at the time).. This marked primacy (Guelph part, whose leader is Niccolò Scotti) was at the origin of Buso's change of party...Buso had become (with the protection of his Ghibelline uncles Pallavicini of Busseto) leader of gangs of 3000-4000 men who brought together exponents of Piacenza Ghibellinism, and were capable of seriously threatening the city and lording it over the countryside; then he escaped to Mantua, where the Lombard Ghibellines were hiding, leader of gangs capable of conferring with a Ghibelline general from a completely different region such as Prospero Colonna; only to end up killed in a conflict between bandits over loot.” and they were able to seriously threaten the city and lord it over the countryside; then he escaped to Mantua, where the Lombard Ghibellines were hiding, leader of gangs capable of conferring with a Ghibelline general from a completely different region such as Prospero Colonna; only to end up killed in a conflict between bandits over loot.” and they were able to seriously threaten the city and lord it over the countryside; then he escaped to Mantua, where the Lombard Ghibellines were hiding, leader of gangs capable of conferring with a Ghibelline general from a completely different region such as Prospero Colonna; only to end up killed in a conflict between bandits over loot.”ARCHANGELS

See also:
•  The ghost of Count Buso
•  Condottieri di ventura

For more on the Douglas Scotti families of Italy, see our Italy portal.

Source

 

Sources for this article include:
  • Roberto Damiani, author of the Condottieri di ventura website


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