Lodge Bearsden

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matriculatin   

 Lodge Bearsden has the distinct honour of having been awarded our own Coat-of Arms, which was awarded by the Lord Lyon King on the 26th of June 1961.
The following passage is an explanation of the honours or devices upon the Lodge Bearsden Coat-of-Arms:

On the sinister or right side of the shield are the honours of the Grand Lodge of Scotland; the three castles represent the three illustrious builders of the temple at Jerusalem.

The golden chevron represents the rafters of Grand Lodge and the compasses are only known to the Master.

The green field may be interpreted as meaning wisdom; the gold of the chevron represents the pure, God given light of Freemasonry emanating from the Grand Lodge of Scotland.

The colour of the castles may be taken as representing the perfect edifice of squared and polished stones.

The Bear's head indicates Bearsden.

The black and gold triangles are part of the shield of His Grace, the Duke of Argyll, the Chief of the Clan Campbell, one of whose clansmen namely Campbell of Succoth owned land around Bearsden.

The silver buckle with the slender prong represents the noble family of Douglas of Mains. The silver buckle with the broad prong represents the Laird of Luss, Colquhoun, Knight Baronet, hereditary Chief of the Clan Colquhoun who is also a landowner in Bearsden.

The cordlike dividing is indicative of the wreath or chaplet usually shown on the heraldic helmet meaning affection showered by ladies on the knights of old, and today similarly for the tolerance and support by the ladies of the Lodge.

The complete white quarter within the included device is the constitutionally chosen emblem of the Lodge indicating purity and all that is noble and true.

The muzzle means that virtuousness and unpleasantness are held in check.

The checked collar represents the dreadful uncertainty of our existence.

Finally the thistle forms the floral badge of Scotland.

Lodge Bearsden has the distinct honour of having been awarded its own Coat-of Arms, which was awarded by the Lord Lyon King on the 26th of June 1961.
The following passage is an explanation of the honours or devices upon the Lodge Bearsden Coat-of-Arms:

On the sinister or right side of the shield are the honours of the Grand Lodge of Scotland; the three castles represent the three illustrious builders of the temple at Jerusalem.

The golden chevron represents the rafters of Grand Lodge and the compasses are only known to the Master.

The green field may be interpreted as meaning wisdom; the gold of the chevron represents the pure, God given light of Freemasonry emanating from the Grand Lodge of Scotland.

The colour of the castles may be taken as representing the perfect edifice of squared and polished stones.

The Bear's head indicates Bearsden.

The black and gold triangles are part of the shield of His Grace, the Duke of Argyll, the Chief of the Clan Campbell, one of whose clansmen namely Campbell of Succoth owned land around Bearsden.

The silver buckle with the slender prong represents the noble family of Douglas of Mains. The silver buckle with the broad prong represents the Laird of Luss, Colquhoun, Knight Baronet, hereditary Chief of the Clan Colquhoun who is also a landowner in Bearsden.

The cordlike dividing is indicative of the wreath or chaplet usually shown on the heraldic helmet meaning affection showered by ladies on the knights of old, and today similarly for the tolerance and support by the ladies of the Lodge.

The complete white quarter within the included device is the constitutionally chosen emblem of the Lodge indicating purity and all that is noble and true.

The muzzle means that virtuousness and unpleasantness are held in check.

The checked collar represents the dreadful uncertainty of our existence.

Finally the thistle forms the floral badge of Scotland.


See also:
Douglas Lodeg 409 - Linlithgow


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Last modified: Saturday, 18 March 2017