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Index of first names

Indentured Servants

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

Many Scots arrived in America and the west Indies as indentured servants.  They were, in effect, slaves.

                                             
    Place of servitude DOB Place of origin Port of departure Ship Occupation Date of servitude Source Notes
Douglas/ Alexander Maryland         1676 1  
Douglas Charles Jamaica 1714 Orkney, Scotland London, England     1731 2  
Douglas George Virginia 1703   London, England     1721 2  
Douglas/ Isabella Pennsylvania 1682       1698 2  
Douglas James Virginia Liverpool, England Globe   1698 2  
Douglas James [Virginia] 1742     Brass founder 1774 3 1
Douglas John Virginia 1683         1692 4 2
Douglas Margaret Pennsylvania         1733 5  
Douglas Margaret           1767 2 7
Douglas Margaret Pennsylvania         1735 5 3
Douglas Robert Jamaica 1706       1721 2 4
Douglas/ Thomas       Liverpool, England ?     1700 6  
Douglas William Maryland         1682 7  
Douglas/ William Virginia 1609         1621 8  
Douglass James             1698 6  
Douglass William Georgia         1734 9  
Dougle Catherine Lancaster, Virginia         1696 10 5&6
                   

 

Sources:

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Notes:

1. 

2. Ship master: Captain Obedience Johnson

3. Same as above?

4.  'A poor lad'

5.

6.  Ships masters: Mr John Gilchrist; Mr Mottrom Wright

7. Transported May 1767

 

An indentured servant is a labourer under contract of the employer for some period of time, usually three to seven years, in exchange for such things as ship's passage, food, land and accommodations.

Unlike a slave, an indentured servant was required to work only for a limited term specified in a signed contract.

 

A major problem with the system of indentured servitude was that in many cases, an indentured servant would become indebted to their employer, who would forgive the debt in exchange for an extension to the period of their indenture, which could thereby continue indefinitely. In other cases, indentured servants were subject to violence at the hands of their employers in the homes or fields in which they worked.

 

The labor-intensive cash crop of tobacco was farmed in the American South by indentured laborers in the 17th and 18th centuries.[1] Indentured servitude was not the same as the apprenticeship system by which skilled trades were taught, but similarities do exist between the two mechanisms, in that both require a set period of work.

 

For more details, se The White Slave Trade

 

 

 

 

 

Any contributions will be gratefully accepted

 

 




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Last modified: Saturday, 18 March 2017