James Stuart Douglass

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James Stuart Douglas was a plantation owner in Tensas Parish, Louisiana, USA.  He was probably the son of the James Douglass Sr. detailed below:

Buck Ridge Plantation, Tensas Parish, Louisiana, USA, Founded ca. 1837
Listed in the 1860 Slave Schedules with seventeen slaves.

James S. Douglass Sr. left the plantation in his will to his wife, Emeline Evans Douglass and his brothers, Stephen Douglass and Archibald Douglass. In 1840, a parish judge ordered the sale of Buck Ridge Plantation, slaves, cattle, corn, etc. The property was purchased by Emeline Evans Douglass and Archibald Douglass, James' brother.

Buck Ridge Plantation was owned by James Stuart Douglass, Sr. until he died in 1837. He left it to his wife, Emaline Evans Douglass, and his brothers, Stephen Douglass and Archibald Douglass. Emaline changed its name to Shady Grove Plantation. She remarried in 1841 to Maxwell Bland. When she died in 1849, she left the plantation to her children. But, her husband, Maxwell, sold the property without the permission of the minors - and it later became a court case when the children wanted their property.


Shady Grove Plantation, Tensas Parish, Louisiana, USA, Founded ca. 1837

James S. Douglass Sr. left the plantation in his will to his wife, Emeline Evans Douglass and his brothers, Stephen Douglass and Archibald Douglass.

Elsewhere, it is recored:
Jas. A. Douglas, Black Ridge 89 slaves
Geo. Douglass, Shady Grove 83 slaves

William D. Rollins, planter, Point Pleasant, La., who was originally from Claiborne county, Miss., born in Port Gibson on July 29, 1850, and was the son of Amariah and Lucinda (Russell) Rollins, married, on May 29, 1834, Miss Lucinda Russell, a native of Tennessee, and to them were born twelve children, including Mary B, who married James S. Douglas.
James and Mary Douglas had seven children: Blanche (wife of Capt. B. Leathers), Archie, George, Lulu (wife of W.J. Hardee), Mary, John R. and Allen T.

James Stuart Douglass, born 3 Mar 1838 in Claiborne County, Mississippi, USA,
died 16 Apr 1890 (aged 52) in Tensas Parish, Louisiana, USA
He is buried in Wintergreen Cemetery, Port Gibson, Claiborne County, Mississippi, USA in plot Section A, Lot 22
married
Mary B. Rollins Douglass, born 7 Mar 1836, died 7 Mar 1903 (aged 67)
She is buried in Wintergreen Cemetery, Port Gibson, Claiborne County, Mississippi, USA in plot Section A, Lot 22


Find a Grave lists children (with grave markers) as:
• Infant son Douglass, unknown–1879
• Infant daughter Douglass, 1858 – unknown
Blanche Douglass Leathers, 1860–1940
• James S. Douglass, 1867–1882
• James M. Gillespie Douglass, 1872–1878
Note that this conflicts, apart from Blanche, with the list above.


Cotton sales:
Cotton sales

Note:
Tensas Parish was the home to many successive indigenous groups in the thousands of years before European settlements began. Some village and mound sites once built by these various peoples are preserved today as archaeological sites.

Following Indian Removal by the United States government in the 1830s, the land was sold and this area was developed by European Americans for cotton plantations, the leading commodity crop before the Civil War. Planters moved into the area from the eastern and upper South, either bringing or purchasing numerous enslaved African Americans as workers. They developed plantations along the river and Lake St. Joseph, as waterways were required for transportation routes and access to markets. In 1861, according to the United States Coast Survey map, 90.8% of the parish's inhabitants were slaves.

The Douglas family would appear to be early settlers.

See also:
 Tensas marriages


Source

 

Sources for this article include:
  • Louisiana Genealogy Trails
  • Sankofa-gen Wiki

  • Any contributions will be gratefully accepted






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    Last modified: Thursday, 16 January 2020