This page was last updated on 21 March 2018

Click here to 
Print this page

Biography finder

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

J

K

L

M

N

O

P

Q

R

S

T

U

V

W

X

Y

Z

 

 

Index of first names

The case of Mrs. Margaret Douglass  

 

 

 

 

 

 

FEATURE ARTICLES
 

Robert Burns, Scotland's bard, who was so close...Robert Burns Find out just how close Scotland came to losing the poet to Jamaica, and the role played by Patrick Douglas

Seven Daughters of Eve Almost all people of native European descent, wherever they may live throughout the world, can trace their ancestry back to one of seven women, hence, the Seven Daughters of Eve.

ScotaPharoah's daughter - Queen of Scots. A new book, Scota, Egyptian Queen of the Scots, by Ralph Ellis, claims to prove that this origin myth was no made-up story but the actual recording of an Egyptian exodus that did indeed conclude in Scotland.

Douglas Heritage store opens. look for Douglas history books in our on-line bookstore.

 Robert the Bruce. The 700th anniversary of his coronation was celebrated on 24th March 2006 others.

Rogues and vagabonds. Not all Douglases have been goody goodies - read about horse theives, and others.
  
Slaves and slavers. Slaves and tales of daring-do, as the Douglases hunt down the slave traders.

The Douglas Heart. A heart features on many Douglas family coats of arms, cests etc, including the one at the top of this page.

DNA for women. For about £180, the scientists at Oxford Ancestors will trace ancient maternal ancestry by testing mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), which is passed down from mother to child and changes little over time.

DNA Lineage testing by DNA. A new research project seeks volunteers to help prove Douglas connections

Research legends and myths.  Many families have cherished myths and stories about their immigration to America or other pivotal events and people. We show you how to determine which family legends are true or false.

 
PLEASE CONTACT US
 

If you have any questions or comments about the information on this site, please contact us . We look forward to hearing from you.

If you wish to stimulate debate, challenge the content or respond to requests for help, then our Forum, may be the place to do it.

 
In mid-century, at the same time that religious instruction was waning as the primary goal of education -- at least among reformers -- religious instruction of free and enslaved blacks in the South appeared to take on a renewed urgency. A number of slave rebellions, including one led by Nat Turner in 1831, which involved several free and literate blacks and which he claimed was divinely inspired, had underscored for whites the need to maintain tight control over the literacy of blacks and the tenor of their religious beliefs. Although every southern state had outlawed the teaching of reading and writing to enslaved blacks (and in some cases, free blacks as well), there is considerable evidence that some whites defied the law.

For example, in 1853, a Mrs. Margaret Douglass of Norfolk, Virginia, "being greatly interested in the religious and moral instruction of colored children and finding that the Sunday school where they were allowed to attend was not sufficient," began teaching free black children to read and write in her home. Mrs. Douglass pleaded ignorance of the law, having believed that it applied only to the teaching of slaves, and the mayor announced his intention to dismiss the charge; however, the Grand Jury chose to indict her. In her defense, she demonstrated that teaching free black children to read had been a common practice in the city's Sunday schools for years. The jury's penalty of one dollar was overturned by a Judge Baker, who imposed a month-long prison sentence, "as an example to all others in like cases."

In rendering judgement, Baker spoke at length about the importance of religious instruction of blacks and its role in making slaves moral and happy, but stressed that it should be kept separate from "intellectual" instruction. He blamed this prohibition against black education on "abolition pamphlets and inflammatory documents" intended "to be distributed among our Southern negroes to induce them them to cut our throats." http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/aia/part4/4h2945t.html

 

This article forms part of our Slave Trade series.

 

Any contributions will be gratefully accepted



 

 

Errors and Omissions

The Forum

What's new?

We are looking for your help to improve the accuracy of The Douglas Archives.

If you spot errors, or omissions, then please do let us know

Contributions

Many articles could benefit from re-writing. Can you help?


 

If you have met a brick wall with your research, then posting a notice in the Douglas Archives Forum may be the answer. Or, it may help you find the answer!

You may also be able to help others answer their queries.

Visit the Douglas Archives Forum.

 

We try to keep everyone up to date with new entries, via our What's New section on the home page.

We also use the Community Network to keep researchers abreast of developments in the Douglas Archives.

 
 
 


Back to top

The content of this website is a collection of materials gathered from a variety of sources, some of it unedited.

The webmaster does not intend to claim authorship, but gives credit to the originators for their work.

As work progresses, some of the content may be re-written and presented in a unique format, to which we would then be able to claim ownership.

Discussion and contributions from those more knowledgeable is welcome.

Contact Us

Last modified: Saturday, 18 March 2017