Rev. Alexander Douglas

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Alexander Ada    

 


The death of the Rev. Alexander Douglas, a well-known Methodist minister, took place on 1st February 1922 at his home, Auchinleck, Sherwood-road, Toowong.

The late Mr. Douglas, who was born at Rocky River, New South Wales, in 1858, the son of John Douglas and his wife Ann Douglas (née Asher) who arrived in Moreton Bay on the Conrad in 1855 from Morayshire in Scotland,  together with their three daughters Ann, Margaret and Jessie. They joined the gold rush at Rocky River in New South Wales.  Alexander studied at Newington College, Sydney, and entered the Methodist ministry when only 19 years of age. He arrived in Queensland in 1882, and two years later married Miss Ada Edmonds, daughter of Mr- George Edmonds, of South Brisbane. During his ministry he was stationed in various circuits, including Townsville, Pimparaa, Bundaberg, Sandgate, and Redland Bay, and at Clarence River and Junee, in New South Wales.

He opened the first Methodist Church at Southport, and took an active part in all church affairs. During the past 20 years he had been a supernumerary minister in the Brisbane district, and rendered good service, especially at Toowong. He was favourably known for his excellent preaching of the gospel, and for the felicitous phrasing and beautiful imageries of his addresses, while his pastoral work was characterised by great diligence. He leaves a widow, one daughter, and five sons, four of whom including Dr. Douglas, saw service in the Great War.

His descendants became a leading medical family in Australia.


Source

 

Sources for this article include:
  • The Queenslander, 11 February 1922


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