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*William Elkins, Sr.

Male 1796 - 1880  (84 years)


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  • Name *William Elkins 
    Suffix Sr. 
    Born 1796  Pulaski County, Kentucky Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died Sep 1880  92 Years; Brown County, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I11766  My Genealogy

    Father Drury Drewrea Elken Elkin Elkins,   b. Between 1760 and 1765, Halifax, Now Henry County, Virginia Per County Map Changes Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1846, Jackson County, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 86 years) 
    Mother Margaret,   b. 1766, Possibly Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1836, Jackson County, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 70 years) 
    Married Between 1778 and 1779  Montgomery County, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F5229  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 1 Rhoda Stephens,   b. Abt 1790, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1837, Jackson County, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 47 years) 
    Married 15 Feb 1816  Pulaski County, Kentucky Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • SOURCE: Pulaski County Marriage Records Book I 1799 - 1850
      Compiled by Pulaski County Historical Society
      Pulaski Library
      North Main Street
      Somerset, Kentucky 42501
      Obtained: 30 March 2007
      Davenport Public Library
      321 Main Street
      Davenport, Iowa 52801 - 1490
      SC 976.963 PUL
      Page 47
      15 February 1816 Elkins, William Stephens, Rhoda
      Pres. Surety, E. Barnes M.B. Hugh Adams
      [SLJuhl, compiler; sljuhl1234@yahoo.com]

      SOURCE: www.Ancestry.com - Kentucky Marriages, 1802-1850
      Dodd, Jordan, database on-line. Provo, UT, USA: MyFamily.com, INc.,1997. Electronic transcription of marriage records held by theindividual counties in Kentucky. Database of Kentucky marriages to1850.
      [Obtained: Saturday, December 02, 2006; SLJuhl, compiler]

      SOURCE: SOURCE: www.Ancestry.com - U.S. and International MarriageRecords, 1560-1900.
      Yates Publishing, database on-line. Provo, UT, USA: MyFamily.com,Inc., 2004. Electronic transcription of marriage records. [Obtained:Saturday, December 02, 2006; SLJuhl, compiler]
    Children 
     1. *Ambaziah Amoyiah Amaziah Elkins,   b. Between 1816 and 1818, August 1984 Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     2. Rachel Rachael Elkins,   b. 1818, Pulsaki County, Kentucky Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     3. Sarah Sallie Elkins,   b. 14 Feb 1819, Brown County, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Aft 1857, Jackson County, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 38 years)
     4. Drury Andrew Elkins,   b. 12 Oct 1819, Pulaski County, Kentucky Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 15 Jan 1862, Elliottsville, Elkinsville Area, Brown County, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 42 years)
     5. *Joseph Elkins,   b. 13 Feb 1823, Near Elkinsville, Brown County, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 19 May 1913, 90 Y, 3 M; Freetown, Salt Creek Township, Jackson County, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 90 years)
     6. Stephen Steven Elkins,   b. 1825, Brown County, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     7. Richard Elkins,   b. Abt 1826, Jackson County, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Jeffersonville, Brown County, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location
     8. William Elkins, Jr.,   b. Between 1827 and 1830, Jackson County, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 8 Feb 1847, Jackson County, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 20 years)
    Last Modified 24 Jan 2013 
    Family ID F4586  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 2 Margaret Pauley Polly,   d. Abt 1857, Brown County, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married 20 Jul 1837  Brown County, Indiana; Brown County, Johnson Township History Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • Marriage Book A, 1830-1850; Brown County Court House; Aug. 1982; perCarol Stultz & Annie Barber:
      29 May 1837 -- Issued Marriage License for William Elkins and MargaretPolly - Booth of Brown County, Indiana. "I, Nathan Davis, on the 20thof July injoined the ties of Matrimony between William Elkins andMargaret Polly - 1837."

      Indiana Marriage Collection, 1800-1941
      Name: William Elkins
      Spouse Name: Margaret Polly
      Marriage Date: 20 Jul 1837
      Marriage County: Brown
      Book: Family History Library, Salt Lake City, UT
      OS Page: 1295890
      Source Citation: Title: , , ; Book: Family History Library, SaltLake City, UT;Page: 1295890.
      Ancestry.com. Indiana Marriage Collection, 1800-1941 [databaseon-line].
      [Transcribed 12 January 2008, SLJuhl, compiler]

      Indiana Marriage Collection, 1800-1941
      Name: William Elkins
      Spouse Name: Margaret Polly
      Marriage Date: 20 Jul 1837
      Marriage County: Brown
      Performed By: Elkins, William
      Comment: Elkins, William married Polly, Margaret on 20 Jul 1837 inBrown County, Indiana
      Source Title 1: Elkins, William married Polly, Margaret on 20 Jul 1837in Brown County, Indiana
      Source Title 2: Indiana
      Brown County
      Source Citation: Title: Elkins, William married Polly, Margaret on 20Jul 1837 in Brown County, Indiana, Indiana
      Brown County
      Ancestry.com. Indiana Marriage Collection, 1800-1941 [databaseon-line].
      [Transcribed 12 January 2008, SLJuhl, compiler]
    Last Modified 24 Jan 2013 
    Family ID F4587  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 3 Ann Hedrick,   d. Bef 1870, Brown County, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married 1 Sep 1859  Brown County, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Last Modified 24 Jan 2013 
    Family ID F4588  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 4 Sarah Horney Boles,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Married 10 Dec 1863  Brown County, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Last Modified 24 Jan 2013 
    Family ID F4589  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • Rhoda is the daughter of Francis Stephens, married 1). RICHARD ELKINS11 November 1806, Pulaski County, Kentucky, four known children ofthis union: Francis (male), Thomas, Drury, and Rachel -- Rhodamarried 2). WILLIAM ELKINS, 15 February 1816 at Pulaski County,Kentucky -- SEVEN known children of this union: Amaziah, Sarah,Joseph, Drury, William, Stephen, and Richard.
      WILLIAM AND RHODA (STEPHENS) ELKINS came to Indiana (Jackson County),ca. 1817. This family being the first white family to settle inJackson County. They lived first in a block house built to protectthem against the Indians in the area. With Drury and Jesse Elkinsfollowing shortly after William & Rhoda made their move to Indiana.Living with Rhoda in 1820 census at the time is her father FrancisStephens as well.

      FROM THE NOTES OF JOYCE LORRAINE CLORE ELKINS OF PARKE COUNTY, INDIANA
      PERSONAL JOURNAL--March 10, 1955
      TOPIC: WILLIAM ELKINS
      PAGE: 1 of 1
      "William Elkins, (1797-1880) son of Drewera (Drury)(1760-1840) andMargaret (Maiden name unknown) Elkins. Born about 1797 possibly inClarke County, Kentucky. His parents were there in 1792 and stayeduntil after his proposed sister was married to Samuel Stogdill in1798. Soon after they moved to Pulaski County, Kentucky, nearSommerset.
      William married his brothers widow (Richard) Rhoda Stephens Elkins(1788/90-1836/7) on February 20, 1806 in Pulaski County, Kentucky.Surety: E. Barnes, and M.B. Hugh Adams. Rhoda was born in Virginia,and the daughter of Francis Stephens.
      Shortley after they married, they moved to Jackson County, Indianaabout 1817, coming by covered wagon up the White River with thefamilies of Shipley, Wilkerson, Sextons, Lutes, and Kinworthy's. Theylived for awhile in a block house. Too much water in the area becamea problem and some died of fever. So, they moved onto Finley's inSalt Creek Township, and finally moving to more hilly country.(William) settled his family in what is now Johnson Township, BrownCounty, Indiana. The town of Elkinsville was named after him, butnothing remains today except the cemetery. It was a prosperous townin the mid eighteen-eighties.
      Not all of his children are known and after four marriages, Williampassed away September 1880. At present have found no record ofburial." [Transcribed 08 January 2008, SLJuhl, compiler, Joyce'sdaughter]

      Excerpts in The Jackson County Indiana History Book, page 340, underRichard Elkins, it states, "Richard died in the War of 1812. In 1816,his brother William, married Rhoda and about 1817, moved to theFreetown area." "...About 1823, William's parents (Richard's parentsas well), Drury ca. 1765 - ca. 1846 and Margaret ca. 1766 - ca. 1836and brother, Jesse married Nancy Adams moved here."

      In the 1820 census in Jackson County, Indiana, it gives:
      3 males under 10 yrs old:
      1 male 10 to 15 yrs old:
      1 male 16 to 26 yrs old: William Elkins himself
      2 females under 10 yrs old:
      1 female 26 to 44 yrs old: Rhoda (Stephens) Elkins
      Up through the 1850 census, these Elkins families not only lived inJackson County, but some lived in Brown County after it was formed in1832-1836 from Jackson County.
      NOTE: "The little town of Elkinsville in Brown County is where thisWilliam Elkins is living in the 1850 census records, and he is thoughtto be the first settler there. They probably didn't move necessarily,because Jackson & Brown Counties were divided up by 1836." [1982-1985,Carolyne Elkins Stoltz of Danville, Indiana]

      On the 1830 census sheet for Jackson County, Indiana (p.432) islisted: James C. Graham, William Runnels (Reynolds), James Elkins,and Jonathon Graham for Jackson County along with William Elkins,Drury Elkins (elder), Jesse Elkins, Francis Elkins, and SamuelStogdell (elder) in the same census living very near by to the others.

      U.S. General Land Office Records, 1796-1907
      Name: William Elkins
      Issue Date: 16 Sep 1835
      State of Record: Indiana
      Acres: 40
      Accession Number: IN0300__.426
      Metes and Bounds: No
      Land Office: Jeffersonville
      Canceled: No
      US Reservations: No
      Mineral Reservations: No
      Authority: April 24, 1820: Sale-Cash Entry (3 Stat. 566)
      Document Number: 5437
      Legal Land Description: Section Twp Range Meridian Counties
      36 8-N 2-E 2nd PM Brown
      Ancestry.com. U.S. General Land Office Records, 1796-1907 [databaseon-line].
      [Obtained & Transcribed 12 January 2008, SLJuhl, compiler-copy oforiginal on file]

      Land Patent Details
      Accession/Serial #: IN0300__.426 BLM Serial #: IN NO S/N
      Patentee: WILLIAM ELKINS
      State: INDIANA
      Acres: 40
      Metes/Bounds: No
      Issue Date: 9/16/1835
      Land Office: Jeffersonville
      Cancelled: No
      U.S. Reservations: No
      Mineral Reservations: No
      Authority: April 24, 1820: Sale-Cash Entry (3 Stat. 566)
      Document Nr.: 5437
      Accession/Serial Nr.: IN0300__.426
      BLM Serial Nr.: IN NO S/N
      SESE 36/ 8-N 2-E No 2nd PM IN Brown
      http://www.glorecords.blm.gov/PatentSearch/Detail.asp?Accession=IN0300%5F%5F%2E426&Index=36&QryID=8269%2E765&DetailTab=2
      [Obtained 12 April 2007, SLJuhl, compiler]

      1840 (p.380) - 1850 (p.245) Census finds William in Johnson Township(Elkinsville), Brown County, Indiana with wife Margaret Polly, listedas a farmer, both 53 years old, white, and value 600.

      U.S. General Land Office Records, 1796-1907
      Name: William Elkins
      Issue Date: 10 May 1848
      State of Record: Indiana
      Acres: 39.73
      Accession Number: IN2870__.071
      Metes and Bounds: No
      Land Office: Jeffersonville
      Canceled: No
      US Reservations: No
      Mineral Reservations: No
      Authority: April 24, 1820: Sale-Cash Entry (3 Stat. 566)
      Document Number: 19617
      Legal Land Description: Section Twp Range Meridian Counties
      31 8-N 3-E 2nd PM Brown
      Ancestry.com. U.S. General Land Office Records, 1796-1907 [databaseon-line].
      [Obtained & Transcribed 12 January 2008, SLJuhl, compiler-copy infiles]

      U.S. General Land Office Records, 1796-1907
      Name: William Elkins
      Issue Date: 1 Feb 1849
      State of Record: Indiana
      Acres: 39.73
      Accession Number: IN2900__.379
      Metes and Bounds: No
      Land Office: Jeffersonville
      Canceled: No
      US Reservations: No
      Mineral Reservations: No
      Authority: April 24, 1820: Sale-Cash Entry (3 Stat. 566)
      Document Number: 21492
      Legal Land Description: Section Twp Range Meridian Counties
      31 8-N 3-E 2nd PM Brown
      Ancestry.com. U.S. General Land Office Records, 1796-1907 [databaseon-line].
      [Obtained & Transcribed 12 January 2008, SLJuhl, compiler-copy infiles]

      1860 Census finds the family still in Brown County, Indiana, but inHamblin Township (Bean Blossom), (p.157). William with wife Ann(Hedrick), Mary Ann & George probably grandchildren.

      In the 1870 Census, Johnson Township, Brown County, Indiana, Williamis living in the home of his daughter Mariah and son-in-law WilliamStogdill.

      In the 1880 Census, William is remarried and living in JohnsonTownship, Brown County, Indiana still. William is 85 years old atthis time, listed as a farmer from Kentucky, along with Sarah (wife),age 76, born in Indiana.

      SOURCE OF CENSUS RECORDS: Joyce Lorraine Clore Elkins of ParkeCounty, Indiana; Records kept in Elkins volumes under William & RhodaElkins section. [daughter, SLJuhl, compiler; sljuhl1234@yahoo.com]

      NOTE: According to Brown County history it was "a" William Elkinswho formed Brown County. The town of "Elkinsville" was believed tobe formed through this family. All that is left of the town now is acemetery on the hill where the town was once located. There are"Elkins" buried there and families related to them. It is surroundedby a wooded area, peaceful and serene. It is well taken care of bythe community in the area. The Town of Nashville, Indiana is justnorth of it's vicinity. A story about the town is that AbrahamLincoln and a family minister traveled through the area often. [1989,Thelma Mae Hoffman of Hillsboro, North Dakota]

      "Elkinsville Reunion 2000
      by Bill Weaver; http://www.ourbrowncounty.com/1000s1.htm
      You might say that a "virtual community" is one that belongs on theWorld Wide Web. Yet, Brown County has had a virtual community for thelast 13 years. In fact, Elkinsville is a larger community now than itever was before.
      Once Elkinsville nestled in the southwestern corner of Brown Countywithin some of its wildest terrain. From 1817 until 1964 it was aplace to be reckoned with, like Christiansburg or Stone Head. And likethese and other small towns Elkinsville has faded in all but memory.In this case, though, time did not remove the community, the U.S. ArmyCorps of Engineers did, a result of the construction of MonroeReservoir.
      But this unnatural death didn't stop former residents from forming acommunity anyway. A community of the spirit.
      This October marks the 13th year the residents of Elkinsville havegathered in the shadow of Browning Hill to celebrate the founding oftheir community.
      It began after a visit to the little cemetery far out in the woodsthat was about all that was left of old Elkinsville. In a nostalgicmood Beverley "B.J." Blankenfeld, wondered if there was some way forthese families to be together again. She began calling and writing herold friends and in 1987 they organized their first reunion.
      Located 18 miles southwest of Nashville, Elkinsville became a town in1850. Named for William Elkins, the first pioneer to settlepermanently in the hills of Brown County, it was said that"[Elkinsville] is a thrifty little place."
      Born in 1796 the young Elkins had come up from Pulaski County,Kentucky with his parents soon after the Treaty of 1809 was signed(resulting in the 10 o'Clock Line). Sometime after 1810 the familysettled near the fort in Leesville, Lawrence County, while the lastyears of the "Indian troubles" played out.
      From there they moved to northern Jackson County and Elkins ismentioned as being in the Maumee area, called Muddy Fork and Finley'sat that time.
      I drove the back roads up from Leesville north through Maumee towardsElkinsville and it is very easy to see how Elkins came north to thebeautiful valley where he made his home.
      This was around 1817 or 1818. Columbus, Indiana was a place with butone log cabin. "Old David Johnson" settled nearby but there was no"extensive settlement until the 1830s." Solomon Fleetwood made thearea's first land claim in 1821 but Elkins and Johnson waited until1834 to secure their claims.
      "The story is that William Elkins built his cabin on his claim, andlater when the lines were run, the chimney of his cabin was on theline.
      Old Billy' without waiting for his supper, hastened toJeffersonville, to take out the land before the other man who claimedthe land next to his, could do so."
      Elkins, who was married four times during his long life, figured inthe first recorded marriage in the area, to Mary Polly on July 20,1837. "Nathan Davis, Justice of the Peace, officiating."
      Strangely this was followed in Goodspeed's history by this sentence,perhaps an editorial error, "No, the marriage of John Arwin to Mill
      Mernervey' Quick, on the 4th of December, 1836, by Squire NathanDavis, was the first in the township."
      Elkins died at the age of 92. It has been reported that his cabin wasmoved to Town Hill in Nashville but there is no evidence to supportthis assertion.
      For many years the town prospered. Somewhat isolated from Brown Countyit traded to the south and west, in the valley that would one day bethe Monroe Reservoir. Butcher and Bennington opened the first storeand a church, school and post office followed.
      Goodspeed, who published his history in 1884, also reported: "Thebottoms about Elkinsville are rich and productive with the wealth ofthe lacustral silt deposited by torrents down the hillside." The hillswere heavily forested with hickory, the saplings of which were cut forbarrel hoops. There were traces found of gold and iron.
      They drilled for oil around 1860, ". . . but escaping gas ignited andfrightened workers so badly that no further efforts were made tosecure oil."
      On Browning Hill, south of town, Keokuk limestone lay on top of thehill in blocks, as if quarried by some ancient race. A mystery neversolved to everyone's satisfaction and giving rise to the legend ofBrowning Mountain.
      Each October two or three hundred people gather at the foot ofBrowning Hill for the Elkinsville Reunion.
      "We're not trying to make a big deal out of it," says Bob Cross. "It'sprimarily for people who lived here or had relatives who lived here.The reunion is more than just a get together. There is anticipationeach year of who will come."
      Folks show up all day, visit the cemetery, renew acquaintances, makenew friends, learn something about their heritage, add to thatheritage, and eat one big whopping pitch-in dinner.
      This year subscriptions will be taken towards the printing of ahistory of Elkinsville, its families and businesses. Compiled, edited,and typeset over the last two years by Nancy Deckard with the help ofher husband Oliver and Bob Cross, (who wrote many of the entries) thebook contains 597 pages, 294 pictures, 97 family stories, recipes, andpoems. Subscriptions are available by writing the ElkinsvilleCommittee c/o B.J. Blankenfeld, 3490 Covenanter Dr., Bloomington,Indiana 47401."
      [Obtained 17 April 2008, SLJuhl, Compiler & Family Genealogist]

      "NOTE: COUNTY CHANGE: Brown County, Indiana was formed in 1836 fromMonroe, Bartholomew, and mostly Jackson Counties. Therefore, our 1820and 1830 census are in Jackson County.
      HISTORY OF BROWN COUNTY, INDIANA - 1889 - JOHNSON TWP. PG. 751
      It is said that William Elkins was a resident of Johnson Twp., asearly as 1819. One thing is certain, he was in the township to livebefore the Indians were removed, which was done in 1821. Some say hisresidence in the county dates further back than that, back in 1816 or1817. It is told that he came directly from the block house, whichhad been built in Lawrence County as a protection from the Indiansduring the War of 1812/1816. That statement is currently made andbelieved, and if true could fix the date of this settlement at aboutthe year 1816, and certainly not later than 1817. Some state that hewas the first white man to live with his family in what is now BrownCounty. Some state that old man Schoonover, who located on the creekthat bears his name (corrupted), in the western part of WashingtonTwp., was the first in the county. The truth cannot be learned. OldDavid Johnson was another early resident of the Twp. The date of hissettlement cannot be given. It should be remembered that theterritory comprising Johnson Twp. (except a small portion of thenorthwestern corner) was obtained by cession treaty from the Indiansin 1809, and that the old boundary lines, which cross the northeastern corner, was established at that date. The land was surveyedsouth of this line in 1812, and soon afterwards was open tosettlement. No settlers appeared except Elkins, and perhaps Johnson,until after 1820. Then a few families arrived, but no extensivesettlement occurred until the decade of the thirty s.
      ELKINSVILLE, INDIANA:
      This village is a creature of comparatively recent origin. It startedup during the decade of the fifties, and was named in honor of thefirst settler of the township and founder of the village. It is saidthat Butcher and Bennington opened the first store, and that a mannamed Morris was in there with goods afterwards. The village was soisolated from other villages that it had quite an extensive trade inthe early years. It was not long before blacksmiths, and carpentersappeared and soon the population could be numbered, by the dozens. Itis a thrifty little place." Carol Stultz's notes.
      NOTE: My brother Joseph and his wife were the first in our family tovisit what is left of Elkinsville and the cemetery in 1996. At thattime he took many photos for a panaramic view of the cemetery itselfand of the Elkins headstones in the cemetery. In 1998, myself, Mother(Joyce), and my husband George did get a chance to visit the cemetery. Elkinsville actually is almost non-existant, and only a cemeteryremains. We were traveling on the Elkinsville road which leaves StateRoad 135 at Story, Indiana to the cemetery, and folks on horse backwere riding through the area. It certainly gave us a flavoring ofwhat it must have been like for those family members living in theearly c.1800-1900 era when their feet or horses were their only modeof transportation. An old fashioned corner grocery store wasavailable on a T-road just prior to reaching the turn off to thecemetery road where a traveler can stop to refresh themselves ifdesired. For the cemetery there was a winding rugged road about onemile north of Old Elkinsville off of Elkinsville Road that twists andturns up the hill side, with no guard rails, until it reached the toparea of the hill that was well manicured with head stones pepperingit's clearing amidst surrounding wooded trees and evergreen pineareas. It's also my understanding that the cemetery originally wasnamed "Hall Cemetery, and had been in the Johnson Township, but is nowin the Van Buren Township due to boundary changes. I did correspondper e-mail with the Nashville, Brown County, Indiana library on the26th of June c.2002, and they assured me that a listing is at thelibrary of all of the burials at the cemetery from the Brown CountyHistorical Society." [Transcribed 30 Mar 2005, SLJuhl, compiler]

      Excerpts from the Jackson County History Book - 1886, Chapter IXX ofSalt Creek Township,
      Page 439 - "One of the first to settle in Salt Creek Township was JohnLutes who built a small log cabin a half a mile north of Houston.George Wagoner settled a quarter of a mile east of Houston; JoshuaBrown a mile to the west, and William Winkler and Samuel Stodgill(spelled Stockdell in the book) were in the same neighborhood. A fewyears later came James Acton and George Gable, James Mulky, MIchaelRudelph, Solomon Cox, and Joseph Young, etc..., other settlements weremade on Muddy Ford, and at Finley's. At the former, Joel Jackson,Phillip Highnote, thomas Scott, John Scott, Arthur Martin, JohnBlerings, Silas Mahuron, Jesse Isaacs, and Squire Sims.
      At Finley's were William Elkins, Drury Elkins, James Stephens, and theFleetwoods. Etc..."
      Page 441 - "Early Meetings & Churches" - "...The first churchorganized was a Methodist, and the meeting for the purpose was held atthe residence of Joshua Brown and wife, D(rury) Elkins and wife,Samuel Stockdell (Stogdill) and wife, The Hills and Actons. Etc..."
      Page 594-595 - "Salt Creek Township" - "In the fall of 1823 the firstschoolhouse was built in Salt Creek Township. This was a small loghouse, etc... The pupils who attended this school were...Frank andThomas Elkins." [Transcribed 13 January 2008, SLJuhl, compiler]