William Douglas, Painter

Click here to 
Print this page

Biography finder

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

J

K

L

M

N

O

P

Q

R

S

T

U

V

W

X

Y

Z

 

 

Index of first names

Mure Memorial 
		Church, Baillieston  

 


This page is a stub.  You can help improve it.

William Douglas
Painter

William Douglas, house-painter and wallpaperer, first appears in the Glasgow Post Office Directory in 1880, trading from 26 West Campbell Street, in a fairly upmarket area of terraced townhouses interspersed with businesses. Douglas was the son of a farmer from Countlich, Dowally, in rural Perthshire, and trained as a house-painter during his teens in Blairgowrie. By 1871, he and his widowed mother had moved to the Gorbals, Glasgow, probably in search of better employment prospects.

By 1881, he had built up a business employing seven men and two boys, and was the decorator used by McKissack & Rowan for their Mure Memorial Church, Baillieston, in 1882. The scheme – 'in pleasing tones, and with suitable ornaments' – seems to have been quite plain, appropriately for a budget-conscious, working-class congregation. The masons who worked on this building, R. Aitkenhead & Son, were also used by Honeyman, Keppie & Mackintosh.

Douglas steadily prospered, as shown by his home addresses, finally moving c. 1909 from a broad street of lower middle-class tenements to a recently-built suburb of red sandstone villas set in their own gardens at Newlands, overlooking the City. In memory of his birthplace north of Dunkeld, he named his new house Countlich.

William Park Douglas, his son, was active in professional and trades associations connected with pay and training, such as the Incorporated Institute of British Decorators. He was still trading from the firm's premises at 242 West George Street in 1941.

Source

 

Sources for this article include:
  • Glasgow Herald, 1882; The Scotsman


  • Any contributions will be gratefully accepted






    Back to top

     



    The content of this website is a collection of materials gathered from a variety of sources, some of it unedited.

    The webmaster does not intend to claim authorship, but gives credit to the originators for their work.

    As work progresses, some of the content may be re-written and presented in a unique format, to which we would then be able to claim ownership.

    Discussion and contributions from those more knowledgeable is welcome.

    Contact Us

    Last modified: Thursday, 16 January 2020