Douglas...

Click here to 
Print this page

Biography finder

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

J

K

L

M

N

O

P

Q

R

S

T

U

V

W

X

Y

Z

 

 

Index of first names

 


This all metal flintlock pistol is by Alexander Campbell of Doune, Scotland, in 1745-1767.

The lock plate has a simple border engraving and is signed "Alex Campbell." The metal stock features near full coverage scroll engraving accented with silver inlaid scrollwork on the back strap. The engraved scrollwork extends to the hammer and barrel. The barrel has a cannon type muzzle. The rounded trigger has a floral blossom engraving that is repeated on the pick mounted on the butt. The top of the trigger is visible on the back strap. The stock has a ram's horn butt (a common design feature found on Scottish pistols) and an engraved belt hook that has ornate and cut-out mounting hardware on the left side.

The sides of the grip have silver oval plaques engraved with the Clan Douglas crest "Jamais Arrière" ("never behind")" depicting a salamander surrounded by fire. During the late Middle Ages, the Douglas clan was one of the most powerful families in lowland Scotland. At one time, the clan held vast territories that extended to France and Sweden.

The Highland warriors of Scotland carried distinctive arms. Their pistols, unlike those made elsewhere in Great Britain, were constructed entirely from metal, usually steel, and were engraved and often silver-inlaid with geometric and foliate ornament of Celtic inspiration. This pistol, signed by the renowned gunmaker Campbell of Doune, Perthshire, is a classic example of the type. Among the defining features are the scrolled "ram's-horn" butts, button-shaped triggers (without trigger guards), decorative pierced rosettes behind the head of the cock, and belt hooks mounted on the side opposite the locks. These pistols are also noteworthy for their American association, as yet unidentified. 

The pistol's unusually crisp condition testifies to its preservation as treasured heirlooms for almost two centuries. It sold at auction for over $12,000.

 

Sources

 

Sources for this article include:



Any contributions will be gratefully accepted





Back to top

 



The content of this website is a collection of materials gathered from a variety of sources, some of it unedited.

The webmaster does not intend to claim authorship, but gives credit to the originators for their work.

As work progresses, some of the content may be re-written and presented in a unique format, to which we would then be able to claim ownership.

Discussion and contributions from those more knowledgeable is welcome.

Contact Us

Last modified: Wednesday, 18 July 2018