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Index of first names

Stephen Douglas Monument Park

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stephen Douglas MemorialThe Stephen A. Douglas Tomb and Memorial or Stephen Douglas Monument Park is located at 636 E. 35th Street in the Bronzeville neighborhood of Chicago, Illinois (part of the city's Douglas community), near the site of the Union Army and prisoner of war Camp Douglas.

A ten-foot statue of the man best remembered for debating Abraham Lincoln over slavery stands atop a 46 ft column of white marble from his native state, Vermont.

Douglas died from typhoid fever on June 3, 1861 in Chicago, where he was buried on the shore of Lake Michigan.

The site was afterwards bought by the state of Illinois, and the imposing monument by Leonard Volk was built over his grave. The cornerstone was laid in 1861 and the tomb was completed in 1881. The site was designated a Chicago Landmark on September 28, 1977.

The tomb is maintained by the Illinois Historic Preservation Agency as a state historic site.

 

 

 

 

 

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Last modified: Saturday, 18 March 2017