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George Vivert Douglas

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

George Vibert Douglas was born on 2 July 1892 in Montreal, Canada. His education at McGill University was interrupted by military service in France and Flanders during the First World War, for which he was awarded the Military Cross. Returning to Canada in 1919, he resumed his studies receiving his MSc from McGill University in 1921. Shortly afterwards, he accompanied the Shackleton-Rowett Antarctic Expedition, 1920-1921 (leader Sir Ernest Henry Shackleton), as geologist in Quest.

On his return from the expedition, Douglas became the first research student to work at the Scott Polar Research Institute, preparing his report on the geology of South Georgia and other areas. He subsequently lectured in geology at Harvard University until 1926 when he became chief geologist for the Rio Tinto Company. In 1932, he was appointed professor of geology at Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia, retiring from the chair in 1957. He died on 8 October 1958 in Toronto.

Published work, 'Geological observations' by George Vibert Douglas in Shackleton's last voyage. The story of the Quest ... from the official journal and private diary kept by Dr A.H. Macklin by John Robert Francis Wild, Cassell and Company London (1923) SPRI Library Shelf (7)91(08)[1921-1922 Shackleton]

 

Family
George Vibert Douglas was the son of John Vibert and Allie Douglas, who was daughter of Rev George Douglas. He first lived in London, England with his isster, Allie Vibert Douglas and her grandmother

 

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Last modified: Saturday, 18 March 2017