Douglas of Leswalt

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cruggleton Lochnaw 

 


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Leswalt is a village and civil parish in Dumfries and Galloway, south-west Scotland. It lies between Portpatrick and Stranraer in the Rhins of Galloway, part of the traditional county of Wigtownshire. The parish covers around 8 square miles.

In the Middle Ages, the area was probably divided into feudal baronies, each controlled by a Baron of the Court, under the overall control of the Sheriff of Wigtownshire. In ancient times it belonged to the monks of Tongland Abbey.

In 1390 Archibald Douglas, 3rd Earl of Douglas, granted lands at Leswalt to his illegitimate son or relative, William Douglas of Leswalt. William Douglas was self-styled "Lord of Leswalt", and Sheriff of Wigton, but was dismissed by Margaret, Duchess of Touraine, daughter of King Robert III of Scotland and wife of Archibald Douglas, 4th Earl of Douglas, as part of a power struggle in south-west Scotland. Under duress he transferred lands at Lochnaw to Andrew Agnew, constable of Lochnaw Castle, receiving Cruggleton Castle in exchange.

Andrew Agnew had been made hereditary constable of Lochnaw Castle by William Douglas of Leswalt in 1426. He received several charters from James I of Scotland, including one of 31 January 1431, confirming to him and his heirs the office of heritable constable of Lochnaw, with the whole lands and "Barony of Lochnaw". In 1451 Andrew Agnew was confirmed as Hereditary Sheriff of Wigtownshire. In 1458 he was paid as sheriff.

In 1463 when George Douglas of Leswalt (son of William Douglas of Leswalt and Katherine Maxwell) died, the lands of Leswalt and Cruggleton reverted to the Crown, as a consequence of the forfeiture of all of the properties of the Earl of Douglas in AD1456. They were appropriated by Mary of Guelders, the Queen Mother, widow James II of Scotland, and were subsequently claimed by Gilbert Kennedy (later Lord Kennedy), a half-brother to George Douglas, for his son, John Kennedy. These passed to his son, Alexander Kennedy, who made them over to his brother, David Kennedy, 3rd Lord Kennedy, from whom the Earls of Cassilis are descended.







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    Last modified: Sunday, 02 June 2019