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Clementina Johannes Sobiesky Douglas

 

 

 

Clementina Johannes Sobiesky Douglas was born in October 1746 in Scotland, and died Bef. May 16, 1771 in Waterside, Finsthwaite Parish, Cumbria, England.

Variously called the “Cumbrian Princess” and the “Finsthwaite Princess,” Clementina has been reputed to be the illegitimate daughter of Charles Edward Stuart, commonly known as Bonnie Prince Charlie (1720-1788) the Jacobite “Young Pretender” to the throne of Great Britain, by his mistress, Clementina Maria Sophia Walkinshaw (c1720 - 1802). The credence to the myth comes from the names Sobieski, the surname of Charles’ mother, and Douglas, a surname Charles was known to sometimes use as an alias on his clandestine visits to London after the failure of the '45.

In truth, the answer may lay in the devotion of Clementina’s probable father, likely James Douglas, to the Jacobite cause who in turn gave his daughter her highly suggestive name. The only conclusive evidence of Clementina comes from the Finsthwaite Parish church register which recorded her death: “Buried Clementina Johannes Sobiesky Douglas of Waterside Spinster May the 16th Day 1771.” A man known as "Captain Douglas" lived in Finsthwaite and left not long after she died

Athough the Prince was often rumoured to have had more than one child by his mistress Clementina Walkingshaw (see below) and Jacobite history is strewn with such theories, it is generally accepted by serious historians that their (and his) only child was Charlotte, later Duchess of Albany, born in 1753 as Charles himself attested in James III's secretary in 1760 in which he said..... "before 1745 I lived in London, was between then and 1747 undone" and went on to speak of "an obstacle in the way, which has done him (the Prince) no service, and me great hurt". Some commentators have taken this to refer to the birth of a child to her, but if so it can hardly have been the Prince's. In any case, it seems impossible that the daughter of the Pretender could have been hidden from the British government in the eighteenth century.

Her tombstone inscription reads:

In Memoriam
CLEMENTINA
JOHANNES SOBIESKY DOUGLASS,
of WATERSIDE,
BURIED 16th OF MAY 1771
"BEHOLD THY KING COMETH"

Now, what could that inscription mean?

Children of Charles Edward Stuart and Clemintina Walkinshaw:

  • Clemintina Johannes Sobieska Douglas (1746-1771)
  • d unm
  • Charles John Thomas Douglas (1752-1812)
  • married Mary Hester Harvey and had issue
  • Charlotte de Johnstone Douglas (b bef 1784)
  • mistress of Ferdinand de Rohan Prince de Guemene, Archbishop of Bordeaux, by whom she had 3 children

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    Last modified: Saturday, 18 March 2017