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Index of first names

Allison Douglas

 

 

 

 

Allison Douglas, who died, at the age of 56, with her husband John Edwards, was born in Deniliquin, Australia, and spent her childhood moving around outback New South Wales as her father directed the engineering of dams and irrigation schemes. She finished school in Sydney and worked there as a legal secretary before travelling to Europe in 1970, supposedly for six months.

There, she met John; two years later, their daughter Jo was born. Allison took first-class honours in statistics at the then North London Polytechnic, and an MSc in epidemiological statistics, before going on to work in the epidemiological monitoring unit at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine .

She was involved in groundbreaking studies of the effects of radiation exposure on British Nuclear Fuel workers, and was co-author of a paper in the British Medical Journal detailing this work. The results were controversial and Allison was glad to stay out of the glare of media attention that focused on the study and BNFL at the time.

When she and John moved to Wales, she took up spinning, dying, weaving and bee-keeping. She was treasurer of the Gwent Bee-Keepers' Association and the Monmouth tennis club. She created a beautiful garden and she and John also worked hard in their woods, felling firs, planting oaks, digging a pond and returning their ancient woodland to an indigenous species mix. They had a rich cultural life in Wales, enjoying local classical music festivals and Welsh National Opera in Cardiff.

The Guardian, Thursday 3 November 2005

 

 

 

 

 

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Last modified: Saturday, 18 March 2017