Col. Young Norvel Douglass

Click here to 
Print this page

Biography finder

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

J

K

L

M

N

O

P

Q

R

S

T

U

V

W

X

Y

Z

 

 

Index of first names

Col. Young Norvel Douglass   


Col. Young Norvel Douglass was born in Sumner County in 1805, the sixth son of James and Catherine Collier Douglass, a descendant of Col. Edward Douglas and Sarah George(1). He followed the occupation of farming and, in 1834, married Benetta Rawlings, daughter of Dr. Benjamin Rawlings, a pioneer physician of Middle Tennessee.

After his marriage, he located in Gallatin and began merchandising along with his agricultural pursuits. He was a successful farmer and was Captain of one of the first military companies organized in Sumner County, afterwards becoming a Colonel.

His wife died in 1849, and he again married a widow, D. Killebrew, nee Green. There were six children born to the first union, the third child being Capt. Charles Sanders Douglass, who was later a prominent educator of the State.

Col. Douglass died in 1865, in Gallatin, Tennesseee, and at the time of his death he and his brother Thomas were the last two sons of James Douglass living in Tennessee, but there were four other sons then living in Texas. Col. Douglass had many namesakes in all branches of the family.


Notes:
1.  The Douglass family has been prominent in Sumner County since 1785, when Edward Douglass, with all his children, settled on Station Camp Creek a few miles north from Gallatin. He was born in Farquier County, Virginia; married about 1740, Sarah George. But note also that there is some confusion between accounts of said Edward Douglas/Douglass. See here and here


Source

 

Sources for this article include:
  • History, memoirs, and genealogy of the Douglass family, compiled by Malcolm Curtis Douglass.

    Any contributions will be gratefully accepted






  • Back to top

     



    The content of this website is a collection of materials gathered from a variety of sources, some of it unedited.

    The webmaster does not intend to claim authorship, but gives credit to the originators for their work.

    As work progresses, some of the content may be re-written and presented in a unique format, to which we would then be able to claim ownership.

    Discussion and contributions from those more knowledgeable is welcome.

    Contact Us

    Last modified: Thursday, 16 January 2020