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Index of first names

Inglis - A Douglas Sept

 

 

The name originates from the Scots word for English, and the earliest records of it in Scotland are that of Richard Anglicus who witnessed a Charter during the reign of David I in 1153, and Adam le Inglis, who witnessed a confirmation Charter in 1194. Several individuals of the name rendered homage to Edward I of England in 1296. In 1395, Sir William Inglis won a dual against the English champion Sir Thomas Struthers and, the following year, the family was rewarded with the Barony of Manner, becoming followers of the House of Douglas.

In the early years of the fourteenth century, when Douglasdale was repeatedly overrun and often held by the English, the Inglis family tenanted the farm of Weston. Once Inglis managed to overhear the English plans for taking the castle, and at very great risk conveyed a warning to the Douglas. For this and perhaps other services he was asked to name his reward, and he replied that his greatest wish was to be buried under the same roof as his master. Accordingly, the south transept of St Bride's Church was set apart as the burial place of Inglis and his descendants for all time. So goes the tale, and until comparatively recent years descendants of the Douglas Inglises have been buried there.

Thereafter various branches of the family evolved, notably of Craigend, upon whom the Inglis Chiefship devolved following the sale of the Manner Barony in 1709, and of Cramond. Sir James Inglis of Cramond was created a Baronet in 1687, and his son became Postmaster General of Scotland. Rear-Admiral Charles Inglis (1731-91), younger son of Sir John Inglis of Cramond served at sea during the French and Spanish wars. The Baronetcy became dormant(1) in 1817 and the Cramond estate passed to Lady Torphichen, daughter of Sir John Inglis.

Lieut-General Sir William Inglis (1764-1835), son of a surgeon descended from a landed family in Roxburghshire, fought in the Peninsular Wars. John Inglis (1810-91) was Lord Justice General of Scotland in 1867 under the name of Lord Glencorse. Elsie Inglis (1864-1917) was one of the first women medical students at Edinburgh and Glasgow universities and founded a maternity hospital in Edinburgh entirely staffed by women. In 1906, she founded the Scottish Women's Suffragette Movement and, during the First World War, set up three military hospitals in Serbia.

Notes:
1. Or extinct?

 

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Last modified: Saturday, 18 March 2017

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Back to top

The content of this website is a collection of materials gathered from a variety of sources, some of it unedited.

The webmaster does not intend to claim authorship, but gives credit to the originators for their work.

As work progresses, some of the content may be re-written and presented in a unique format, to which we would then be able to claim ownership.

Discussion and contributions from those more knowledgeable is welcome.

Contact Us

Last modified: Saturday, 18 March 2017