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Index of first names

Mount Douglas

 

 

 

 

  1.   Mount Douglas (Alaska)
  2.   Mount Douglas (Alberta)
  3.   Mount Douglas (Antarctica)
  4.   Mount Douglas (British Columbia)
  5.   Mount Douglas (Montana)
  6.   Mount Douglas (New Brunswick)
  7.   Mount Douglas (Nunavut)

 




1.  Mount Douglas is a stratovolcano located south of Kamishak Bay, near the northeasternmost part of the Alaska Peninsula. It lies in the Katmai National Park and Preserve in Kenai Peninsula Borough. The mountain was officially named in 1906 after nearby Cape Douglas based on a 1904 report by USGS geologist G. C. Martin. The Alaska Volcano Observatory currently rates Douglas as Level of Concern Color Code Not Assigned.

The volcano has a warm and highly acidic crater lake approximately 160 m (525 ft) wide. In 1992, the lake has a temperature of 21°C and a pH of 1.1. At the north flank of the volcano unglaciated and relatively uneroded lava flows are found. The last eruption was considered to have occurred during the Holocene (Nye et al.,1998).

 



3. There are a number of places named Douglas in Antarctica, including two named Mount Douglas, and one named Mount Douglass.
mount Douglas
Mount Douglas, Antarctica, named after Ian Ellsworth Douglas a QC who was the Officer in Charge of the Australian Antarctic Base of Davis in 1960 (at the age of 23)




4.  Mount Douglas is a prominent, 260 m (850 ft.) hill in the Greater Victoria municipality of Saanich, British Columbia. It is named for the second governor of the Colony of Vancouver Island, Sir James Douglas, and is affectionately known locally as "Mount Doug." The hill and the surrounding area are protected by a 182 ha (450 acre) municipal park. It also lends its name to a high school, road, neighbourhood, and several businesses. Its many trails, mature second growth forest, striking vistas of the city, and nearby beach make the area a popular destination.

Originally called Cedar Hill, it was home to logging operations in the mid-nineteenth century. Local mills supplied the growing city of Victoria, including the original Hudson's Bay Company fort, transporting lumber south along present day Cedar Hill Road. It was brought under protected status in 1889. Although informally renamed in Douglas' lifetime (it was given the apellation "Mount" in order to honour the governor's status), the name "Mt. Douglas" was not officially adopted until 1910.

The namesake neighbourhood around the base of Mt. Douglas is a mix of residential neighbourhoods, hobby farms and working farms, roughly bounded by Shelbourne Street, Cordova Bay Road, the Blenkinsop Valley and Mckenzie Avenue. The farms of the Blenkinsop Valley are protected by the provincial Agricultural Land Reserve.



5.  Mount Douglas is a mountain in Sweet Grass County in south central Montana in the United States. It is 11,300 feet (3,444 meters) tall.



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Last modified: Saturday, 18 March 2017