Douglas House, Ladybank

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Douglas House  

 


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Ladybank iis a town and former burgh of Fife, Scotland.

Before the 18th century, this area was mostly marshland. In 1247 Roger de Quincy, 2nd Earl of Winchester granted the monks of Lindores Abbey the right to cut peat from a peat-moss called Monegre, to which monks gave the name Our Lady's Bog (the southwestern part of the village is still called Monkstown). Over time this name was shortened to Ladybog.

When the Edinburgh and Northern Railway was constructed in the 1840s, a junction was built here with lines heading towards Perth and Dundee. The station was named 'Ladybank Station' rather than 'Ladybog Station', and the village that developed around the station took the name Ladybank.

The village became a burgh in 1878, and became an industrial centre, with linen weaving, coal mining, and malting the principal industries.

The owner of Douglas House has not been identified, but could have been the property of Robert Douglas.

 

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Last modified: Saturday, 18 March 2017