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Index of first names

Ballumbie Castle

 

 

 

 

balumbie castle

 

Ballumbie Castle was built by the Lovell family.

The Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Scotland record the date of construction as 1545, although Historic Scotland give a date of 14th–15th century. The castle comprised a rectangular enclosure, approximately 21 metres (69 ft) on a side, with round corner towers, overlooking the Fithie Burn.

In the early 17th century it passed to the Maule family, who became Earls of Panmure in 1646. The castle was reported as being ruined by 1682, although the remaining east and south walls were later incorporated into the stable block of Ballumbie House. Today the castle is a ruin again, in private ownership. Access is prohibited beyond the castle's security fencing for reasons of personal safety.

The lands surrounding Ballumbie Castle are known as the Ballumbie Castle Estate, and the lands of Ballumbie Castle remain the caput of this property. These are distinct from the lands of Ballumbie, which were last in the possession of Robert Williamson of Ballumbie, hence there is a Laird of Ballumbie Castle as well as a Laird of Ballumbie.

 

it was home of Kate Barlass

 

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Last modified: Saturday, 16 June 2018