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Index of first names

Julius Preston Douglas

 

 

 

 

Julius Preston Douglas, born in Cornwall, Addison county, Vt., June 12, 1815, was the grandson of James Marsh Douglas.

 

Among the pioneers of Addison county was the family of James Marsh Douglas, who came from Cornwall, Conn., to the town of Cornwall, Addison county, in 1784, where James Marsh Douglas died in 1790. His son, Benajeh Douglas, was born in Cornwall, Conn., August 5, 1780; was a successful farmer and hotel keeper in Cornwall, Vt., for many years. He was much interested in militia affairs in the early days. His first wife was Salome Scott, by whom he had two children, one daughter and one son. His second wife was Betsey Preston. To that union were born two daughters and six sons; one daughter and four sons survive, of whom one is the subject of this sketch. The latter are all well known and respected citizens of Addison county. Benajeh Douglas died in 1828.

Julius Preston Douglas was born in Cornwall, Addison county, Vt., June 12, 1815. His boyhood did not differ materially from that of most boys of that period - it was a period of labor alternating with attendance at the primitive schools of the day. Born and bred on a farm in the most fertile districts of Addison county, within the town of Cornwall; he owes to that wholesome and industrious country life the habits and the character which are at the bottom of so many successes in the world. On reaching manhood, January 3, 1843, Mr. Douglas married Etnily H. Williamson, daughter of Abraham Williamson, an early settler in Cornwall. In the following spring he purchased the Widow Wright farm in Middlebury, thus making his settlement in life most happily complete. His original purchase consisted of seventy-five acres; he is now the owner of two hundred and twenty-five acres, forming a more than comfortable estate in well chosen lands, with a modern and substantial family residence and numerous and convenient farm buildings, all of which has been acquired by his own thrift and energy. A successful farmer and stock-raiser, in addition to which he owns and manages a hay-press in Middlebury village, and has for many years been an extensive dealer and shipper of hay and straw.

Mr. and Mrs. Douglas are the parents of one daughter and two sons. The former, Della F., was the wife of Horace B. Stoddard, of Dumerston, Vt.; she died July 6, 1882. J. Barclay Douglas and Julius Preston Douglas, jr., are still on the home place. Their oldest son, J. B. Douglas, was married February 12, 1873, to Mary B. Germond, who died November 23, 1881, leaving four children - two daughters and two sons. Julius P. Douglas, jr., was united in marriage to Miss Laura Vancor March 26, 1884.

Mr. Douglas never sought public position. His life has been eminently a practical and successful one, and he is still one of the most active and energetic men in the community.

Source: Biographies of Addison County, Vermont

 

 

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