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David (John Drummond) Brown[1]

Male Abt 1750 - 1836  (~ 86 years)


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  • Name David (John Drummond) Brown 
    Born Abt 1750  Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 21 Oct 1836  Erskine St., Sydney, Nsw, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried Scots Church, Sydney Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I47630  My Genealogy

    Father Edward (6th Duke of Perth) Drummond,   d. 1760 
    Mother Elizabeth Middleton,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Married 25 Nov 1709 
    • 1 _MSTAT Friends
    Family ID F20460  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 1 Mary Dunworth Dixon,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Married 1 Apr 1771  St Georges Chapel, London Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Last Modified 24 Jan 2013 
    Family ID F20502  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 2 Mary Partington,   d. 1799 
    Married 16 May 1776  St George's Chapel, London Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Mary Brown,   b. 1785, UK Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1817, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 32 years)
     2. Daughter 2 Brown,   d. died young Find all individuals with events at this location
     3. James Brown,   b. 1781, UK Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     4. David (2nd) Brown,   b. 1789, UK Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 11 Jan 1857, New South Wales Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 68 years)
     5. Thomas Brown,   b. 1787, UK Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Abt 1836  (Age 49 years)
     6. Daughter 3 Brown,   d. died young Find all individuals with events at this location
    Last Modified 24 Jan 2013 
    Family ID F20503  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • From John Griffiths
      Contact for info at jig@pcug.org.au


      According to Brown Family Legend as Record by Blanche Jenkins, greatgrandaughter of David:

      ‘David ‘Was born in Scotland in 1750.’

      ‘His ancestors had large estates’ ‘in Lanark,’ (?) (.. at the time ofthe rebellion in Scotland in 1688, they were confiscated. Hisancestors ‘were followers of the Stuarts, and fled with their King’

      ‘David Brown went to London between 1770 and 1774 and married firstly aMiss Mary Dunworth Dixon by whom he had no children, and secondly’ ‘In1776 he married Mary Partington “ “by whom he had 3 sons and 3daughters. His marriage took place at St Georges, Hanover Square in eachinstance.’

      ‘His grief and loss of estates to which he laid claims (evidentlyattained) in which judgement had been an adverse verdict and having nofurther money to carry on’

      ‘His wife and two daughters dying within a week’ ‘X he came to Australiato begin a new life in other lands with his family, 3 sons and 1daughter.’

      ‘he brought his young family to Australia in 1801 by the Royal Admiraland Earl Cornwallis (supply ships.)’

      ‘James the eldest not liking the conditions returned to India all traceto of him being lost.’


      From Another History of Uncertain Origin which overlaps with the former(more of Blanche Jenkins?):

      ‘David Brown claimed descent from Bruce and Wallace. Randolf Earl ofMoray was William Wallace’s uncle’

      ‘Browns were Jacobites’

      ‘Jacobite seal given by Old Pretender James II to his personal friends,David Brown Snr had it on arrival 1801.’

      ‘David Brown ..said his original family name “was too good a name to dragdown” so kept to the name Brown.’

      ‘David Brown claimed descent from Bruce and Wallace. Randolf Earl ofMoray was William Wallace’s uncle.’ ‘The Stewarts came through Bruce’'..that he could recite his family history back to Robert the Bruce andWilliam Wallace'

      ‘David Brown (landholder) quarrelled with his son David’s family over anunfortunate marriage of the eldest son’ to a convict (Ann Shepherd)‘and left them’. At ‘the age of 86’ he ‘came by horseback to´ his home‘in Erskine Street Sydney’ ‘with and old servant Elkin’ (or Elgin?)‘wherehe died’.*

      ‘Amongst Mary Chisholm (Brown) papers was a memorial ring John Drummond.’


      An Outline History of the Drummonds:

      In 1693 James II, after his deposition, created. him Marques of Drummondand
      Duke of Perth (titles acknowledged and confirmed in 1701- by Louis XIV.of
      France), and conferred upon him various high offices; James died in 1716;
      superseded by his son (8) James who was styled '2nd Duke of Perth" andwho
      having been attainted in 1716, could not succeed the Earldom of Perth;
      superseded by his eldest son [9] James, "3rd Duke", wounded at Culloden:
      (attainted 1746);
      superseded by his brother [10) John , "4th Duke".. attainted 1746, died
      without issue 1747;
      superseded by his uncle [11] John. "5th Duke". died 1757;
      superseded by his brother [12], Edward "6th Duke" died 1760 supposedly
      without
      issue, however:

      "In 1784, the prime minister, William Pitt the younger, and Henry Dundas,then Lord advocate, decided that the time had come to restore theestates, at a fair price, to the heirs of the former owners. This wasdone by an Act passed that year'. The "transaction was applauded inScotland and brought the Exchequer over L90,000."

      "...James Drummond, the lineal descendent of John, Earl of Melfort, laid
      claim and obtained a decreet of the court of Session, 8th March 1785,
      finding him to be the person who would have been entitled to succeed by
      investitures of the estate of Perth had it not been forfeited; andthereupon
      he obtained from the crown a grant of the estate of Perth. The
      reason......was the appearance of a person in London who assumed the nameof
      John Drummond, and asserted that he was the son of Edward, stiled theDuke
      of Perth, and Elizabeth Middleton; but he could not substantiate his
      descent,"
      (From "Biographical Sketches of the Lives of the Attainted Noblemen of
      Scotland")


      History of David Brown According to Various Official Documents:

      David Brown was about born about 1750 in Scotland. (change of name 1754?)

      David was taken to London at the age of 6 (by his mother or father?)

      Sometime between David Brown leaving Edinburgh in 1756 and his marriageto Mary Partington he completed an apprenticeship as a carpenter orcabinet maker.

      There is a record of a David Brown being married at St Georges Chapel,Hanover Square, London, to :

      Mary Dunworth-DIXON on 1 April 1771. Mary died some time in the nextfew years, apparently without issue; and

      Mary PARTINGTON on 16 May 1776.

      The signature of David Brown is the same for both marriages.

      In 1800 there was a shift in policy by the UK government towards its
      handling of its NSW penal colony. The government recognised commercial
      potential of the colony and the need for free settlers particularly with
      some trade or farming skill. Earlier research suggests that whenDavid's
      wife and two of his daughters died he decided to take advantage of the
      change in policy and applied to come to Australia as a free settler.

      Thomas, David's youngest son, is believed to have been born about 1800,and
      was only a baby when David brought his family to the colony. It isevident
      that his wife Mary had passed away just shortly before their departurein December
      1800. Daughter Mary was most likely acting as de facto mother for Thomas.

      The burial register notation on James Chisholm's advice suggests thatDavid
      arrived in Australia on the Royal Admiral which arrive in Sydney on 20
      November 1800, some seven months ahead of the Earl Cornwallis.

      However, in the 1825 "NSW Muster" and 1828 census David himself and hisson
      David II stated that that they arrived in 1801 on the 'Earl Cornwallis'.There is a question of whether David sent someone ahead with familypossessions on the Royal Admiral to prepare for their arrival?

      The Earl Cornwallis was a Convict Transport (CT) vessel - And this wasthe only voyage that this vessel made as a convict transport toAustralia. Built in London, the Earl Cornwallis was a large fully-riggedwooden ship sheaved with copper. It had three decks, square sails onthree masts, and displaced 784 ton. The Master for the journey was JamesTennant. The vessel sailed from Cowes 18 November 1800 and arrived inSydney 207 days later on 18 June 1801 via Portsmouth and Rio de Janiero.It sailed with 193 men convicts and 95 women and arrived in Sydney with166 men and 87 women X 35 deaths occurred on the voyage which is likelyto be indicative of an exceptionally slow voyage, and not having asurgeon aboard the vessel as did the Minerva some six months earlier.David and his family were part of some thirty passengers. There werealso about 25 soldiers aboard.

      On the arrival of the Earl Cornwallis, the Fifth mate Robert Scott fromGlasgow states “This is one of the wildest looking places ever was seen”“The town is pretty large, at first sight you would take it for a camp,”“The houses all straggling, all one story and white, very few natives tobe seen, ” - It is in this setting that David, fifty year old widower,with an baby son 12 to 18 monts old (Thomas) in the care of a 16 year olddaughter (Mary), two other sons, one 18-19 years old (James) the other14-15 years old (David).

      David’s family settled on a grant of 150 acres of land in the district ofEastern Farms at Kissing Point, now known as Ryde. The grant wasapproved on 31 March 1802 by Governor King with the usual rental of 2/-per year commencing after 5 years. The Ryde Psychiatric Hospital is nowlocated on part of this grant. A register of arms listed in April 1802showed that David kept a gun and bayonet at his property. He worked asa cabinet maker and young David and Thomas though often listed aslabourers in census their labours must have been in the form ofapprenticeship, most likely with their father to acquire theirqualifications as carpenters. It is probable that sons David andJames, had begun their training in carpentry in Britain, James would morethan likely have qualified?

      David became the trustee of the Field of Mars Common in 1804 apparentlyfor some years - As one of the few free settlers of substantial propertyamongst the many 30 acre ‘ticket of leave’(ex convicts) farmers’.

      In about 1806, the Browns in the name of David's eldest son, James,obtained a grant of 100 acres of land near Cattai Creek, just to thenorth of Windsor (close to Sydney).

      On 26 January 1806 David's daughter, Mary, was married in St Phillip'sChurch in Sydney to James Chisholm, a soldier in the NSW Corps X Theyhad one child, a son, born to them on 5 November 1806, who was alsocalled James Chisholm.

      Six years later, David’s son James took a position as ship's carpenter onthe "Favorite" and no further record has been found of him since it setsail for India in 1812. Apparently he left a Will, since lost, whichgave his land at Cattai to his father.


      1814 Census lists David as “Cabinet Maker”, “F”(Came Free), and “Off“(stores). It also lists David Brown Jnr and Thomas Brown aslabourers and “Off” government stores.

      David junior married on 28 June 1815 to Mary Elizabeth McMahon at StPhillip's Church in Sydney.

      It appears that his son David and family worked the land at Cattai, andthat David and son Thomas remained at Erskine St, Sydney.

      His daughter Mary died after a long illness in December 1817 at the ageof 32.

      In 1820 David's family in the name of his two remaining children, Davidand Thomas, applied to Governor Macquarie to obtain grants of land.Eventually David received 100 acres and Thomas 60 acres beside the grantgiven to James in 1806. The family had hoped to obtain land on theHunter River and described the land near Cattai Creek as being unsuitablefor cultivation or grazing.

      In the 1825 ‘muster’ David was described as ‘Landholder’.

      David Brown and his sons David and Thomas, were each been promised 150acres at Jerry’s Plains, 122 miles to the north west in 1824 adjoiningthe property of John Duff. Late in the 1820’s Duff acquired Thomas’ 150acres and adjacent to ‘Hampton Park’. David jnr did not settle inperson on the remaining two portions until 1832.’

      David’ occupation whether at the time of the 1814 and 1828 census, andhis death, was given as ‘carpenter’.

      The land at Kissing Point appears to have been managed by his son Davidjnr, as was the property at Cattai, and Jerry’s Plains with David keepinga watchful eye on things?

      1828 Census shows a David Brown 78 years CF on Earl Cornwallis residingwith Mr Chisholm, St Andrews, Lower Minto (now known as Narellan, nearCamden). This was David (I) living with and “helping” his grandson Jameswho managed the property on behalf of his father. It was young James’sbride the next year who named the property ‘Gledswood’.

      David was supposedly at Jerry’s plain in 1835 visiting his son DavidBrown jnr. He may have been there for the opening of the Green Gateroadside inn and adjacent store on 30 June 1835 by David jnr.

      He reportedly left after a bitter argument with son David and familyover Thomas’s marriage to Ann Shepherd, a convict. David is supposed tohave returned (with Elgin) on horseback, to Sydney?

      On 27 May 1836 David’s youngest son, Thomas, died in Sydney.

      Five months later, on Friday, 21 October 1836, David died at the age of86. He supposedly died alone is at his home at Erskine St Sydney, NSWin the company of Elgin his servant. Though it may well have been thesame house that son Thomas and family had lived in? If so, where wereThomas’s widow and three daughters? David was buried on Saturday, 22October 1836 in Scots Church, Sydney.

      David Brown jnr, (David Brown's second eldest son) had twin sons born tohis second wife in 1850. David jnr commemorated his family heritage bynaming the boys 'William Wallace' and 'Robert Bruce'.
      .
      From John Griffiths Contact for info jig@pcug.org.au



      >>>>>>>>>>>>>><<<<<<<<<<<<<<

      Information on this also came from
      From Patricia Smith Email: mamabear4680@yahoo.com

      She sent me a family history that had been in her family for 200 years,some of which is confirmed by John Griffiths more verifiable research. Iattach her E Mail to me as it might help others research.

      My name is Pat and while I was researching my family tree I came uponyour site at ancestry.com, I was hoping you may be able to help me witha story that has been told in our family for 200 years. I will attach ashort history that I am hoping you may have herd before. It is about oneof my ancestors David Brown who always said his real name was JohnDrummond Son of Edward Drummond ( 6th Duke of Perth ) and ElizabethMiddleton. I look forward to your reply.

      Many Thanks
      > Pat
      . John Drummond was about born about 1750 in Scotland to Edward Drummond(6th Duke of Perth) and Elizabeth Middleton. It seems that that theliaison, and the result of it (John Drummond's birth) was the cause ofconsiderable embarrassment to the Drummond family. This apparently causedEdward to Change his name to "David Brown" . Furthermore, on 2 December1753 he had John christened "David Brown" at West Calder parish Church.In 1756 David was taken to London (age 6). (by his mother or father?)Sometime between David leaving Edinburgh for London and his marriage in1771 he completed an apprenticeship as a carpenter or cabinet maker.

      He was married to Mary Dunworth DIXON on 1 April 1771 at St GeorgesChapel London. Mary died some time in the next few years, apparentlywithout issue .
      David was married to (his second wife) Mary PARTINGTON on 16 May 1776 atSt Georges Chapel London. According to family legend, David BROWN 1'sfather was attainted lands and title in Scotland after one the Jacobiterising in 1688 -1745 . He change his name to Brown to save his familysome embarrassment. This may imply that his inheritance was allowed to betransferred to another part of the family.

      Suggestion of estates in Lanarkshire may have been confused withChisholm's place of origin' "In 1784, the prime minister, William Pittthe younger, and Henry Dundas, then Lord advocate, decided that the timehad come to restore the estates, at a fair price, to the heirs of theformer owners. This was done by an Act passed that year'. The"transaction was applauded in Scotland and brought the Exchequer overL90,000."

      About this time David apparently attempted to reverse the attainder as itapplied to him as natural son and heir to Edward Drummond. Unfortunatelyfor him, David could not prove his parentage to Edward, and the courtruled against him on 8 March 1785 in favour of a cousin. The suggestionis that part of the cause for loosing his case was due to lack of money.If David had won he would have had to pay L 52,547-1-6 to the court ofExchequer. (the arrangement with his family may have compromised hisprospects).

      In 1800 there was a shift in policy by the UK government towards itshandling of its NSW penal colony. The government recognised commercialpotential of the colony and the need for free settlers particularly withsome trade or farming skill. Earlier research suggests that when David'swife and two of his daughters died he decided to take advantage of thechange in policy and applied to come to Australia as a free settler.

      Thomas, David's youngest son, is believed to have been born about 1799,and was only a baby when David brought his family to the colony. It isevident that Mary had passed away just shortly before their departure inDecember 1800. Daughter Mary was most likely acting as de facto motherfor Thomas.

      The burial register notation on James Chisholm's advice suggests thatDavid arrived in Australia on the Royal Admiral which arrive in Sydney on20 November 1800, some seven months ahead of the Earl Cornwallis.

      However, in the 1825 "NSW Muster" and 1828 census David himself and hisson David II stated that that they arrived in 1801 on the 'EarlCornwallis' . The is a Question of whether David sent his son and Servant"Elgin" ahead with some of the family possessions on the Royal Admiral toprepare for their arrival?

      The Earl Cornwallis was three decks and 784 ton Convict Transportvessel, sheaved with copper, and built in London. The Master for thejourney was James Tennant. The vessel sailed from Cowes 18 November 1800and arrived in Sydney 18 June 1801 via Portsmouth and Rio de Janiero. Itsailed with 193 men convicts and 95 women and arrived in Sydney with 166men and 87 women
      - 35 deaths occurred on the voyage which is likely to be indicative ofnot having a surgeon aboard the vessel as did the Minerva some six monthsearlier.

      David and his family were part of some thirty passengers. There werealso about 25 soldiers aboard. The Earl Cornwallis arrived some sixmonths after the Minerva. Sydney seems to have changed little - The Fifthmate Robert Scott from Glasgow states "This is one of the wildest lookingplaces ever was seen" "The town is pretty large, at first sight you wouldtake it for a camp," "The houses all straggling, all one story and white,very few natives to be seen, ".

      1814 Census lists David as "Cabinet Maker", "F"(Came Free), and "Off"(stores). It also lists David Brown Jnr and Thomas Brown as labourersand "Off" stores. David received a grant of land at Kissing Point,Cattai, and became the trustee of the Field of Mars Common in 1804apparently for some years - As one of the few free settlers ofsubstantial property amongst the many 30 acre 'ticket of leave' farmers'.

      In the 1825 'muster' it was 'Landholder'. David' occupation whether atthe time of the 1828 census and his death was given as 'carpenter' . Theland at Kissing Point appears to have been managed by his son David II.

      1828 Census shows a David Brown 78 years cf on Earl Cornwallis residingwith Mr Chisholm, St Andrews, Lower Minto (now known as Narellan, nearCamden). This was David (I) living with and "helping" his grandson Jameswho managed the property on behalf of his father. It was young James'sbride the next year who named the property 'Gledswood'.

      David is noted to have kept a servant with him for years who was known aElkin or Elgin. Elgin is considered to be a euphamism for Morau and be apointer a family connection and concealment of family involvment in oneof the rebellions 1745 or earlier?

      Apparently, David was at Jerry's plain in 1835. Supposedly left after anargument with son David over Thomas's marriage to Ann Shepherd, aconvict. He is supposed to have travelled alone on horseback, back toSydney?

      David died on Friday, 21 October 1836 at the age of 86. He supposedlydied alone is at his home at Erskine St Sydney, NSW in the company ofElgin his servant. David was buried on 22 October 1836 in Scots Church,Sydney. Death also apparently, coincides with death of son Thomas aged36?. Ref V18361112 102

  • Sources 
    1. [S883] Hamish Maclaren.