The Douglas Archives Genealogy Pages

Discovering our Douglas Ancestors and their Relatives

*John Wendell, Jr.

Male 1731 - 1808  (76 years)


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  • Name *John Wendell  [1
    Suffix Jr. 
    Born 10 Sep 1731  Boston, Massachusetts Province Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 29 Apr 1808  Portsmouth, Rockingham County, New Hampshire Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I14291  My Genealogy

    Father *John Wendell, Commander,   b. 2 May 1703, New York, New York Province Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 15 Dec 1762, Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts Province Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 59 years) 
    Mother Elizabeth Quincy,   b. Abt 1703, 2ND Daughter; Braintree, Massachusetts Province Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Boston, Massachusetts Province Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married 10 Nov 1724  Boston, Massachusetts Province Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F5296  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 1 Sarah Wentworth,   b. Abt 1731, Eldest Daughter; Portsmouth, Rockingham County, New Hampshire Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 17 Nov 1772, Portsmouth, Rockingham County, New Hampshire Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 41 years) 
    Married 20 Jun 1753  Portsmouth, Rockingham County, New Hampshire Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Stillborn Wendell,   b. Portsmouth, Rockingham County, New Hampshire Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Portsmouth, Rockingham County, New Hampshire Find all individuals with events at this location
     2. Sarah Wentworth Wendell,   b. 5 Oct 1754, Portsmouth, Rockingham County, New Hampshire Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     3. Elizabeth Wendell,   b. 11 Oct 1755, Portsmouth, Rockingham County, New Hampshire Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 16 Jul 1756, Portsmouth, Rockingham County, New Hampshire Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 0 years)
     4. John H. Wendell,   b. 25 Oct 1757, Portsmouth, Rockingham County, New Hampshire Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 15 Aug 1799, Northern New York, New York Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 41 years)
     5. Daniel Wentworth Wendell,   b. 15 Feb 1760, Portsmouth, Rockingham County, New Hampshire Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 27 Jan 1780, Portsmouth, Rockingham County, New Hampshire Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 19 years)
     6. Edmund Wendell,   b. 15 Jul 1762, Portsmouth, Rockingham County, New Hampshire Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 14 May 1763, Portsmouth, Rockingham County, New Hampshire Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 0 years)
     7. Elizabeth Wendell,   b. 9 Apr 1764, 2ND Named; Portsmouth, Rockingham County, New Hampshire Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     8. Helena De Key Wendell,   b. 28 Feb 1766, Portsmouth, Rockingham County, New Hampshire Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     9. Edmund Wendell,   b. 4 Mar 1769, 2ND Named; Portsmouth, Rockingham County, New Hampshire Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     10. Hannah Wendell,   b. 3 Mar 1770, Portsmouth, Rockingham County, New Hampshire Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     11. George Wentworth Wendell,   b. 22 Mar 1771, Portsmouth, Rockingham County, New Hampshire Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 24 Jan 2013 
    Family ID F5294  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 2 Dorothy Sherburne,   b. 20 Aug 1752, Portsmouth, Rockingham County, New Hampshire Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Married 20 Aug 1778  Portsmouth, Rockingham County, New Hampshire Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Dorothy Sherburne Wendell,   b. 11 Feb 1780, Portsmouth, Rockingham County, New Hampshire Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     2. Mary Wendell,   b. 30 Sep 1781, Portsmouth, Rockingham County, New Hampshire Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     3. Daniel Wendell,   b. 25 Nov 1783, Portsmouth, Rockingham County, New Hampshire Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     4. *Abhm Abraham Q. Wendell,   b. 18 Mar 1785, Portsmouth, Rockingham County, New Hampshire Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 27 Mar 1865, Portsmouth, Rockingham County, New Hampshire Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 80 years)  [Stepchild]
     5. Isaac Wendell,   b. 1 Nov 1786, Portsmouth, Rockingham County, New Hampshire Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Portsmouth, Rockingham County, New Hampshire Find all individuals with events at this location
     6. Jacob Wendell,   b. 10 Dec 1788, Portsmouth, Rockingham County, New Hampshire Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 27 Aug 1865, Homestead On Pleasant Street, Portsmouth, Rockingham County, New Hampshire Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 76 years)
     7. Mary Sherburne Wendell,   b. 7 Aug 1790, Portsmouth, Rockingham County, New Hampshire Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     8. Henry Flynt Wendell,   b. 10 Jul 1791, Portsmouth, Rockingham County, New Hampshire Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 24 Jan 2013 
    Family ID F5295  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • 1). SOURCE: Book--THE DIRECT ANCESTRY OF THE LATE JACOB WENDELL OFPORTSMOUTH, NEW HAMPSHIRE, WITH A PREFATORY SKETCH OF THE EARLY DUTCHSETTLEMENT OF THE PROVINCE OF NEW NETHERLAND, 1614--1664. BY JAMESRINDGE STANWOOD, OF BOSTON; COPYRIGHT, 1882, pages 17-34 & 47. Theentire book is 51 pages in length.
      www.neflin.org/srrl; Heritage Quest Online
      The genealogy lineage was obtained beginning with the ancestor fromthe Netherlands to America and the subsequent generations listed inthe book to c.1882 A.D. Even though the book is well over a hundredyears old and the copyright laws are now somewhat laxed with it'susage, only excerpts were noted in this work. The full lineage forthose that are interested is available on the Internet site listedabove.
      START: (Page 27): "JOHN WENDELL, fourth son of John and his wifeElizabeth (Quincy) Wendell, was born in Boston September 10, 1731. Hereceived the requisite preparation for Harvard College, entered thatinstitution at the age of fifteen, and was graduated thence in 1750.Shortly afterwards he removed to Portsmouth, in the Province of NewHampshire, where he established himself as a real estate lawyer adconveyancer, and became subsequently possessed of large landedinterests. He held professional and social relations with many ofthe leading citizens of the time, who were prominent during theRevolutionary period, among whom we note names of Hancock, Quincy,Otis, Laugdon, Livingston, Morris, Hamilton, Jay, and Ethan Allen,while he was the warm personal friend of Hon. Elbridge Gerry, Gen.Philip Schuyler, Gen. Peter Gansevoort, Gen, John Sullivan and ThomasDudley. He was a man of vigorous mind and energetic disposition, andit may be mostly said of him that he contributed freely from hismoderate fortune, as well as by his pen, towards sustaining the standearly taken in the province against the arbitrary exactions of theCrown. Although repeatedly solicited to occupy official station, hepersistently declined so doing, preferring to remain apart from publiclife, and unbiassed in his political opinions. He was a ready speakerand writer, and a man of considerable scholastic taste, in recognitionof which he received the degree of Master of Arts from Yale College in1768, and from Dartmouth in 1773. He died in Portsmouth, April 29,1808, in his seventy-seventh year. John Wendell married (June 20,1753) Sarah, eldest daughter of Daniel and Elizabeth (Frost)Wentworth, of Portsmouth, by whom he had issue of eleven children, towit:" See Listing. (Page 28) "Upon the decease of his first wife(Nov. 17, 1772) John Wendell again married (Aug. 20, 1778) Dorothy,second daughter of Judge Henry and his wife Sarah (Warner) Sherburne,of Portsmouth (b. Aug. 20, 1752), by whom he had further issue, towit:" See Listing.
      [Obtained: 05 January 2007, SLJuhl, compiler]

      (2). SOURCE: An Alphabetical List of the Sons of Liberty who din'dat Liberty Tree, Dorchester"
      Col. William Palfrey, 14 August 1769
      32.7 cm x 40 cm
      http://www.masshist.org/database/onview.cfm?queryID=9
      http://www.masshist.org/objects/2006february.cfm
      ?This list of the 300 Sons of Liberty who dined at the Liberty TreeTavern in Dorchester, Massachusetts was compiled by William Palfrey,one of the participants. His grandson, John Palfrey, donated it to theSociety in August 1869, on the 100th anniversary of the event. Becauseof the organization's secrecy, this list provides a rare glimpse intoits membership.?

      GRIFFEN, WM ESQ. OF VIRGINIA (Ancestor)(WM = William)(Esquire =Gentleman)
      WENDELL, JN Mic (Ancestor)(JN = John Jr.)(Not certain what Mic or Micemeans, Mister perhaps)
      WENDELL, OLIVER (Ancestor)(John's cousin)
      WENDELL, JACOB (Ancestor)(either Oliver's son or John's brother JacobWendell )

      ?Destruction of the Tea in Boston Harbor
      On the night of 16 December 1773, a party of marauding "Indians"boarded three vessels--Dartmouth, Eleanor, and Beaver--that weremoored at Griffin's Wharf in Boston, intending to destroy theircargoes of East India Company tea. This act was the culmination ofmany days of posturing, threats, and counter-threats among themerchants and government officials and the radical colonists. Incensedat the landing of three ships carrying East India Company tea in lateNovember, colonists had been blocking the unloading of the tea andconvening meetings of their local Committees of Correspondence, whichdemanded that the tea be returned to England without delay.?

      ?Earlier that day, a mass meeting at the Old South Church attractedthousands of people from Boston and the surrounding towns, includingpatriots Samuel Adams, James Warren, and Josiah Quincy, Jr. After aday of inflammatory discourse, Governor Thomas Hutchinson's refusal toallow the ships in port to leave without discharging their cargoes oftea was apparently the last straw. Samuel Adams rose, announcing thathe did not see what more the inhabitants could to do save theircountry. At this, war-whoops filled the hall, and between 30 and 60men, disguised as Indians, rushed out of the hall and into the streetsof Boston, heading for Griffin's Wharf and its three tea-laden ships.In all, 340 large wooden chests containing some 90,000 pounds of teawere dumped into Boston Harbor that night. To this day the identitiesof the participants in the "tea party" are shrouded in mystery, buthistorian Benjamin W. Labaree identifies members of the SONS OFLIBERTY, freemasons, and members of local Committees of Correspondenceas the most likely "Indians." (To view a list of the Boston Sons ofLiberty in 1769, please see our our online display.)(NOTE: A copy ofthe Image is in the Park/Griffin Family Records belonging to Penny SuePark Wethington.)

      Images from the collections of the
      Massachusetts Historical Society.
      Massachusetts Historical Society
      1154 Boylston Street (directions)
      Boston, MA 02215-3695
      Tel: 617.536.1608
      Fax: 617.859.0074

      3). SOURCE: United States Federal Census Records
      1790-Portsmouth, Rockingham County, New Hampshire
      John Wendell
      free white males above 16 yrs-1
      other free white individuals above 16 yrs-4
      free white females-3
      all other free persons-0
      slaves-1
      total=9
      1810-Dover, Strafford County, New Hampshire
      *In both census records Wentworth are listed on the same pages withJohn Wendell.

      4). SOURCE: http://www.stars-end.net/bryants/gsbdetail8.html#I1_588
      John Wendell (1731 - 1808)

      5). SOURCE: ?Sunapee, NH
      Like many other towns, this one went through four name changes beforeits incorporation: Savile, Corey's Town, and then Wendell, for one ofthe Masonian proprietors, John Wendell. The name Sunapee wassubstituted for Wendell by the Legislature in 1850. The town, LakeSunapee, and Mount Sunapee share the name which comes from theAlgonquin Indian words suna, meaning goose, and apee, meaning lake.The Indians called the area Goose Lake because it was a favorite spotof wild geese. Sunapee includes the village of George's Mills.
      http://www.adamdow.com/article/archive/1838/ Sullivan County?
      [obtained 05 January 2007, SLJuhl, compiler]

      6). SOURCE: ?Graduates of Harvard University
      1750 - 1751
      Bachelors of Arts (A.B)
      From 1642 to 1869, inclusive, Bachelors of Arts were entitled toreceive the degree of Master of Arts (A.M.) in course, three yearsafter graduation. 1750
      John Wendell, A.M.; A.M. (Hon.) Yale 1768, Dart. 1773 1808
      http://colonialancestors.com/harvard15.htm?
      [Transcribed 05 January 2007, SLJuhl, compiler]

      7). SOURCE: "The Patriot Test
      To the Selectmen and Committee of the Town of Portsmouth: COLONY OFNEW-HAMPSHIRE, In Committee of Safety, April 12th, 1776. In order tocarry the underwritten Resolve of the Hon. Continental Congress intoexecution, you are requested to desire all Males above twenty-oneyears of age (lunaticks, idiots, and negroes excepted,) to sign to theDeclaration on this paper; and when so done, to make return hereof,together with the name or names of all who shall refuse to sign thesame, to the General Assembly, or Committee of Safety of this Colony.M. WEARE, Chairman.
      In Congress, March 14, 1776.
      Resolved, That it be recommended to the several Assemblies,Conventions, and Councils,
      or Committees of Safety of the United Colonies, immediately to causeall persons to be disarmed, within their respective Colonies, who arenotoriously disaffected to the cause of America, or who have notassociated and refuse to associate, to defend by arms, the UnitedColonies, against the hostile attempts of the British Fleets andArmies. Extract from the minutes. CHARLES THOMPSON, Sec'y.
      In consequence of the above Resolution, of the Hon. ContinentalCongress, and to shew our Determination in joining our AmericanBrethren, in defending the Lives, Liberties, and Properties of theInhabitants of the United Colonies:
      We the Subscribers, do hereby solemnly engage, and promise, that wewill to the utmost of our Power, at the Risque of our Lives andFortunes, with Arms, oppose the hostile Proceedings of the BritishFleets, and Armies, against the United American Colonies." THERE WEREMULTIPLE NAMES INCLUDING:
      JOHN WENDELL'S. http://seacoastnh.com/brewster/44.html
      [obtained 05 January 2007, SLJuhl, compiler]

      8). SOURCE: "Delegates to Congress . Letters of delegates toCongress, 1774-1789, Volume 4, May 16 1776-August 15 1776
      Electronic Text Center, University of Virginia Library
      http://etext.lib.virginia.edu/toc/modeng/public/DelVol04.html
      Elbridge Gerry to To: John Wendell
      Dear sir
      (1)
      Philadelphia 11th June 1776
      ?I recd. your Favours of the 21st & 27th May & Am obliged to You forthe Intelligence therein contained; (2) It will afford me Pleasure tocontinue the Correspondence proposed, & from being apprized of thepolitical Movements in your Colony as well as the principlesproductive of the same, I doubt not that Opportunities will frequentlyoffer of touching upon some thing that will add Harmony to the commonCause.
      I agree with You with Respect to some Inconveniences that will arisefrom opening our Ports & am persuaded that had they continued openthro the Winter & been closed in the Spring a much larger Supply ofArms & Ammunition would have been introduced into the Colonies & lessAdvantages have been derived to the Enemy by Captures; but as it hashappened the matter has been veiwed in a different light, & theRestrictions on Trade have been so pressingly felt by the Merchants &Farmers in the southern Colonies that it became necessary to adoptthis Measure of opening the ports to quiet.?
      Pg. 188 cont?d their Minds: notwithstanding which I believe littleTrade will be carried on, unless in armed Vessels, untill it shall bebetter protected. With Respect to the French Nation their Interestseems to be connected with that of the Colonies under the presentSituation of the latter, for if France can avail herself of theirtrade it will greatly add to her resources while G. Britain's areproportionably weakened, & if she ever expects to rise superior to thelatter there cannot be a more favourable Opportunity for effecting itthan is furnished by the present contest. Great Care is certainly tobe taken by the Colonies in forming such an Alliance, but so long asit is confined to Commerce & they grant only their Trade for aprotection thereof, there cannot be Danger arising from theConnection, but, as it appears to me, there will be all theprobability of immediately engaging France in a Rupture wth Britain,by which Means a Diversion will be made to her Arms in Europe & such aWar carried on as will be most for the Interest of the Colonies.
      I have attended to your Desire relative to the [ . . . ] (3) It mustbe by your Brother Mr Wendell who is the present Agent in the Colony.In Massachusetts Bay the [ . . . ,] but whether any provision is madein New Hampshire You can best determine; if not & the [ . . . ] isunder the Direction of the Agent, Mr. Wendell. It must be [ . . . ]for the Congress have in most of the Colonies Agents of their ownappointment, who were nominated agreable to order by the MarineCommittee, but Mr. Langdon having been nominated for Portsmouth & anobjection made on Account of his being a Member of Congress, the placeis not yet filled from the Want of Oppertunity, & I think ofConsequence Mr. Wendell continues their Agent untill a new appointmenttakes place. I see no objection to his Reappointment.
      Our Affairs in Canada are at present unfortunate. I have never likedtheir appearance since my Arrival here & hope that a favourable Changewill take place, but however it may happen We must use Misfortune as aStimulus to new & greater Exertions.
      I observe you have begun to Speculate in the papers & think You havemade a good Exordium: I hope You will go on & successfully finish theTheme. The paper will undoubtedly prove a good one but the printers inour own Colony & this City generally furnish Us with One or two a Daywhich are as many as We can well peruse.
      I observe what You hint relative to my Brother J.G.(4) & shall attendthereto.
      Pray inform Doctor Jackson that in April last I sent him by MrTileston of Boston 130 Dollars granted by Congress & shall be glad toknow whether he has received it.
      My Compliments to Miss Sally & all Friends & believe me Sir yoursincere Friend & humble servant, Elbridge Gerry
      P.S. I hope soon to see your Colony following the others in declaringfor Independence."
      Note:
      RC (PHi)
      1 John Wendell (1731-1808), although a native of Boston, hadestablished himself as a merchant in Portsmouth, N.H. Shipton, HarvardGraduates, 1 2:592-97.
      2 A photostat of Wendell's letter of May 27 is in the Gerry Papers,DLC.
      3 More than two dozen words have been inked out in the first half ofthis paragraph, which deals with Wendell's request for Gerry's supportin securing his appointment as vendue master for New Hampshire toserve under his brother-in-law, Joshua Wentworth when Wentworth, whowas appointed provincial prize agent by General Washington, wasreplaced by John Langdon, Wendell's request became a dead issue. Seeibid.; and Marine Committee to the Prize Agents appointed by GeorgeWashington, October 18, 1776, in Clark, Naval Documents, 6:1 322-23.
      4 In his May 27 letter, Wendell had commented that "I think theDisappointment that Brother J[ohn] Gerry met with in his Regiment hasbeen a Damage to him as it has soured & chagrined him, I hope you willfind an Opening to provide for him, He is a Man of Discernment andgood Conduct & wd make an Excellent Officer." Wendell to Gerry, May27, 1776, Gerry Papers, DLC. "
      [Transcribed 05 January 2007, SLJuhl, compiler]

      9). SOURCE:http://www.answers.com/topic/rockingham-county-new-hampshire
      History
      The area that today is Rockingham County was first settled byEuropeans moving north from the Plymouth Colony in Massachusetts asearly as 1623. The government was linked tightly with Massachusettsuntil New Hampshire became a separate colony in 1679, but Countiesweren't introduced until 1769.
      Rockingham was identified in 1769 as one of five original counties forthe colony. It is named for Charles Watson-Wentworth, 2nd Marquess ofRockingham, who had been Prime Minister in 1765-1766. The county wasorganized in 1771, with its County Seat at Exeter. In 1844 its areawas reduced by the formation of Belknap County to the northwest. In1997 the county court facilities were moved to the current county seatat Brentwood.

  • Sources 
    1. [S1275] John Wendell of Portsmouth, Rockingham County, New Hampshire, 1). SOURCE: Book--THE DIRECT ANCESTRY OF THE LATE JACOB WENDELL OFPORTSMOUTH, NEW HAMPSHIRE, WITH A PREFATORY SKETCH OF THE EARLY DUTCHSETTLEMENT OF THE PROVINCE OF NEW NETHERLAND, 1614--1664. BY JAMESRINDGE STANWOOD, OF BOSTON; COPYRIGHT, 1882., (Name: www.neflin.org/srrl; Heritage Quest Online; Obtained: 05 January2007; 1). SOURCE: Book--THE DIRECT ANCESTRY OF THE LATE JACOB WENDELL OFPORTSMOUTH, NEW HAMPSHIRE, WITH A PREFATORY SKETCH OF THE EARLY DUTCHSETTLEMENT OF THE PROVINCE OF NEW NETHERLAND, 1614--1664. BY JAMESRINDGE STANWOOD, OF BOSTON; COPYRIGHT, 1882., John Wendell ofPortsmouth, Rockingham County, New Hampshire (www.neflin.org/srrl;Heritage Quest Online; Obtained: 05 January 2007), Source Medium: Book 1). SOURCE: Book--THE DIRECT ANCESTRY OF THE LATE JACOB WENDELL OFPORTSMOUTH, NEW HAMPSHIRE, WITH A PREFATORY SKETCH OF THE EARLY DUTCHSETTLEMENT OF THE PROVINCE OF NEW NETHERLAND, 1614--1664. BY JAMESRINDGE STANWOOD, OF BOSTON; COPYRIGHT, 1882. .).